Malaysia: Bioethics as a biosecurity measure for monitoring genetic engineering activities against the threat of bioterrorism

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Malaysia's proactive position in promoting biotechnology has also spurred scientists in local universities and research institutions to adopt genetic engineering techniques for the betterment of their research. However, Malaysian scientists must increasingly be aware that genetic engineering can either be used for benevolent or malevolent purposes triggering the dual use dilemma. This is because certain materials, information and technology can not only be utilized for military and civilian purposes but also for criminal and terrorist activities. Therefore, this research has the purpose of examining the actions to be taken by Malaysia to censor the forms, methods, results and acquisition of knowledge of genetic engineering from being misused. Underlying Malaysia's actions is the bioethical principle, that is, the duty to prevent harm which is relevant to this research. It is proposed that the actions Malaysia should take are to be embedded within provisions of the Biosafety Act 2007 and its regulation. The method relied for this research is one that is qualitative in analyzing primarily the Biosafety Act 2007, international organization documents from websites, a case law and secondary resources. The results from this research indicate that the Biosafety Act 2007 can be utilized in order to achieve the said purpose of this research through existing provisions while in certain instances, amendments to some provisions which are unclear or inadequate together with the Biosafety (Approval and Notification) 2010 Regulations needs to be done.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCHUSER 2012 - 2012 IEEE Colloquium on Humanities, Science and Engineering Research
Pages1-9
Number of pages9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Event2012 IEEE Colloquium on Humanities, Science and Engineering Research, CHUSER 2012 - Kota Kinabalu, Sabah
Duration: 3 Dec 20124 Dec 2012

Other

Other2012 IEEE Colloquium on Humanities, Science and Engineering Research, CHUSER 2012
CityKota Kinabalu, Sabah
Period3/12/124/12/12

Fingerprint

Monitoring
Threat
Genetic Engineering
Bioethics
Malaysia
Bioterrorism
Notification
Military
Harm
Censor
International Organizations
Terrorist
Resources
Biotechnology
Web Sites

Keywords

  • bioethics
  • Biosafety Act 2007
  • bioterrorism
  • Genetic engineering
  • laboratory biosecurity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Archaeology

Cite this

Malaysia : Bioethics as a biosecurity measure for monitoring genetic engineering activities against the threat of bioterrorism. / Abdul Majid, Marina.

CHUSER 2012 - 2012 IEEE Colloquium on Humanities, Science and Engineering Research. 2012. p. 1-9 6504271.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abdul Majid, M 2012, Malaysia: Bioethics as a biosecurity measure for monitoring genetic engineering activities against the threat of bioterrorism. in CHUSER 2012 - 2012 IEEE Colloquium on Humanities, Science and Engineering Research., 6504271, pp. 1-9, 2012 IEEE Colloquium on Humanities, Science and Engineering Research, CHUSER 2012, Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, 3/12/12. https://doi.org/10.1109/CHUSER.2012.6504271
Abdul Majid, Marina. / Malaysia : Bioethics as a biosecurity measure for monitoring genetic engineering activities against the threat of bioterrorism. CHUSER 2012 - 2012 IEEE Colloquium on Humanities, Science and Engineering Research. 2012. pp. 1-9
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