Malay identity in southeast asia: Understanding the cultural and linguistic phenomena

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In this limited essay, one cannot take into account all the complexities of the diverse cultural and linguistic phenomena reflected in Malay identity in an area as vast as Southeast Asia. Nonetheless, in the context of the conference theme, our starting point will be the recognition that language (and literacy) has been a highly valued commodity within the maritime network of Island Southeast Asia ever since the Tang dynasty. Reid’s (1988) characterization of the culture of sixteenth century ports as a phenomenon comprising three components: Islamic religion, Malay ethnic identity and Malay language will serve as framework for exploring contemporary Southeast Asia. Today the three-component phenomenon (commodity) has become a package of three options from which to choose. We will survey some of the many “tailored” responses to that package of options in Indonesia, Brunei, Thailand, Malaysia and Singapore. Although much more can be said about each “tailormade” commodity, especially with respect to age, gender and class, and although there are many more regional and local tailored packages, an encyclopedic digest is not within our reach now. Language and ethnicity are diversely and complexly linked, and in the case of Island Southeast Asia, the hinterland and the vast seas are similarly interdependent.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9932-9934
Number of pages3
JournalAdvanced Science Letters
Volume23
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2017

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Southeastern Asia
Linguistics
Southeast Asia
commodity
linguistics
Language
Islands
Brunei
Malaysia
language
Indonesia
literacy
Singapore
Religion
Thailand
religion
sixteenth century
ethnicity
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ethnic identity

Keywords

  • Cultural
  • Linguistic phenomena
  • Malay identity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science(all)
  • Health(social science)
  • Mathematics(all)
  • Education
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Engineering(all)
  • Energy(all)

Cite this

Malay identity in southeast asia : Understanding the cultural and linguistic phenomena. / Collins, James Thomas.

In: Advanced Science Letters, Vol. 23, No. 10, 01.10.2017, p. 9932-9934.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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