Lymphocyte subsets in systemic lupus erythematosus.

S. K. Cheong, S. F. Chin, N. C. Kong

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterised by increased B cell activity and depressed T cell function. However, the contribution of the immunoregulatory system to its pathogenesis is still unclear. The recent development in the production of monoclonal antibodies and the availability of bench-top flow cytometers have allowed rapid quantitation of peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets. We analysed the distribution of the lymphocyte subsets in 24 patients with active SLE and 18 with inactive SLE. The distribution of immunoregulatory cells in 72 normal volunteers was used as control. Statistical analysis showed that there were significant differences between both the SLE groups and the normal controls, for total lymphocytes, T cells, B cells, T helper cells, T suppressor cells, T helper/suppressor ratio and natural killer cells. There was a significant difference for T helper cells between active and inactive SLE. T helper cells levels were found to be low in inactive SLE and lower in active SLE. It appears that treatment-induced remissions did not restore the levels of immunoregulatory cells to normal. Thus, T helper cell levels reflect disease activity and longitudinal assays of T helper cells may serve as an indicator of disease reactivation.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)121-125
    Number of pages5
    JournalThe Malaysian journal of pathology
    Volume19
    Issue number2
    Publication statusPublished - 1997

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    Lymphocyte Subsets
    Helper-Inducer T-Lymphocytes
    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
    B-Lymphocytes
    T-Lymphocytes
    Natural Killer Cells
    Autoimmune Diseases
    Healthy Volunteers
    Monoclonal Antibodies
    Lymphocytes
    Control Groups

    Cite this

    Cheong, S. K., Chin, S. F., & Kong, N. C. (1997). Lymphocyte subsets in systemic lupus erythematosus. The Malaysian journal of pathology, 19(2), 121-125.

    Lymphocyte subsets in systemic lupus erythematosus. / Cheong, S. K.; Chin, S. F.; Kong, N. C.

    In: The Malaysian journal of pathology, Vol. 19, No. 2, 1997, p. 121-125.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Cheong, SK, Chin, SF & Kong, NC 1997, 'Lymphocyte subsets in systemic lupus erythematosus.', The Malaysian journal of pathology, vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 121-125.
    Cheong, S. K. ; Chin, S. F. ; Kong, N. C. / Lymphocyte subsets in systemic lupus erythematosus. In: The Malaysian journal of pathology. 1997 ; Vol. 19, No. 2. pp. 121-125.
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