Low back pain and associated risk factors among health science undergraduates

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Identification of associated risk factors is important to enable successful implementation of low back pain prevention strategies. To date, there is limited research data on back pain among young adults in Malaysia despite an increasing incidence of this disabling condition worldwide. A cross-sectional survey was conducted to determine the incidence of low back pain (LBP) and associated factors among health science undergraduates. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to full time students of a main public university. One hundred and forty undergraduates; mean age 21.4±1.3 years, 70% female, 60% in year 3 of study, participated in the survey. The results showed that 31% spent between 6 and 8 h and another 31% spent more than 9 h sitting in a day. Twelve percent of the undergraduates rated their fitness level as 'poor'. The incidence of LBP was 40.3% among the undergraduates. LBP incidence was associated with age (X2=12.1, p=0.007), years of study (X 2=8.7, p=0.03), self-rated physical fitness (X2=7.0, p=0.02) and hours spent sitting (X2 =8.7, p=0.03). Gender, body mass index and hours spent in sports and physical activity were not associated with LBP. The findings from this study demonstrate that physical fitness and sitting duration is associated with low back pain among health science undergraduates. Health science undergraduates should improve their physical fitness, practice frequent breaks and stretching during sitting. This will help to minimize LBP related to decreased fitness levels and prolonged sitting.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)423-428
Number of pages6
JournalSains Malaysiana
Volume43
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2014

Fingerprint

Low Back Pain
Health
Physical Fitness
Incidence
Malaysia
Back Pain
Sports
Young Adult
Body Mass Index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Students
Research

Keywords

  • Back pain
  • Physical fitness
  • Sitting
  • Undergraduates

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Low back pain and associated risk factors among health science undergraduates. / Mohd Nordin, Nor Azlin; Ajit Singh, Devinder Kaur; Kanglun, Lim.

In: Sains Malaysiana, Vol. 43, No. 3, 03.2014, p. 423-428.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{383d099666e444adb0b3984f18ead2c1,
title = "Low back pain and associated risk factors among health science undergraduates",
abstract = "Identification of associated risk factors is important to enable successful implementation of low back pain prevention strategies. To date, there is limited research data on back pain among young adults in Malaysia despite an increasing incidence of this disabling condition worldwide. A cross-sectional survey was conducted to determine the incidence of low back pain (LBP) and associated factors among health science undergraduates. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to full time students of a main public university. One hundred and forty undergraduates; mean age 21.4±1.3 years, 70{\%} female, 60{\%} in year 3 of study, participated in the survey. The results showed that 31{\%} spent between 6 and 8 h and another 31{\%} spent more than 9 h sitting in a day. Twelve percent of the undergraduates rated their fitness level as 'poor'. The incidence of LBP was 40.3{\%} among the undergraduates. LBP incidence was associated with age (X2=12.1, p=0.007), years of study (X 2=8.7, p=0.03), self-rated physical fitness (X2=7.0, p=0.02) and hours spent sitting (X2 =8.7, p=0.03). Gender, body mass index and hours spent in sports and physical activity were not associated with LBP. The findings from this study demonstrate that physical fitness and sitting duration is associated with low back pain among health science undergraduates. Health science undergraduates should improve their physical fitness, practice frequent breaks and stretching during sitting. This will help to minimize LBP related to decreased fitness levels and prolonged sitting.",
keywords = "Back pain, Physical fitness, Sitting, Undergraduates",
author = "{Mohd Nordin}, {Nor Azlin} and {Ajit Singh}, {Devinder Kaur} and Lim Kanglun",
year = "2014",
month = "3",
language = "English",
volume = "43",
pages = "423--428",
journal = "Sains Malaysiana",
issn = "0126-6039",
publisher = "Penerbit Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Low back pain and associated risk factors among health science undergraduates

AU - Mohd Nordin, Nor Azlin

AU - Ajit Singh, Devinder Kaur

AU - Kanglun, Lim

PY - 2014/3

Y1 - 2014/3

N2 - Identification of associated risk factors is important to enable successful implementation of low back pain prevention strategies. To date, there is limited research data on back pain among young adults in Malaysia despite an increasing incidence of this disabling condition worldwide. A cross-sectional survey was conducted to determine the incidence of low back pain (LBP) and associated factors among health science undergraduates. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to full time students of a main public university. One hundred and forty undergraduates; mean age 21.4±1.3 years, 70% female, 60% in year 3 of study, participated in the survey. The results showed that 31% spent between 6 and 8 h and another 31% spent more than 9 h sitting in a day. Twelve percent of the undergraduates rated their fitness level as 'poor'. The incidence of LBP was 40.3% among the undergraduates. LBP incidence was associated with age (X2=12.1, p=0.007), years of study (X 2=8.7, p=0.03), self-rated physical fitness (X2=7.0, p=0.02) and hours spent sitting (X2 =8.7, p=0.03). Gender, body mass index and hours spent in sports and physical activity were not associated with LBP. The findings from this study demonstrate that physical fitness and sitting duration is associated with low back pain among health science undergraduates. Health science undergraduates should improve their physical fitness, practice frequent breaks and stretching during sitting. This will help to minimize LBP related to decreased fitness levels and prolonged sitting.

AB - Identification of associated risk factors is important to enable successful implementation of low back pain prevention strategies. To date, there is limited research data on back pain among young adults in Malaysia despite an increasing incidence of this disabling condition worldwide. A cross-sectional survey was conducted to determine the incidence of low back pain (LBP) and associated factors among health science undergraduates. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to full time students of a main public university. One hundred and forty undergraduates; mean age 21.4±1.3 years, 70% female, 60% in year 3 of study, participated in the survey. The results showed that 31% spent between 6 and 8 h and another 31% spent more than 9 h sitting in a day. Twelve percent of the undergraduates rated their fitness level as 'poor'. The incidence of LBP was 40.3% among the undergraduates. LBP incidence was associated with age (X2=12.1, p=0.007), years of study (X 2=8.7, p=0.03), self-rated physical fitness (X2=7.0, p=0.02) and hours spent sitting (X2 =8.7, p=0.03). Gender, body mass index and hours spent in sports and physical activity were not associated with LBP. The findings from this study demonstrate that physical fitness and sitting duration is associated with low back pain among health science undergraduates. Health science undergraduates should improve their physical fitness, practice frequent breaks and stretching during sitting. This will help to minimize LBP related to decreased fitness levels and prolonged sitting.

KW - Back pain

KW - Physical fitness

KW - Sitting

KW - Undergraduates

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84896852664&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84896852664&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84896852664

VL - 43

SP - 423

EP - 428

JO - Sains Malaysiana

JF - Sains Malaysiana

SN - 0126-6039

IS - 3

ER -