Long-term rehabilitation after stroke: Where do we go from here?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Current guidelines in stroke management are divided on the issue of providing further rehabilitation to stroke patients who have had stroke six months ago and longer. Whilst consensus considers that long-term rehabilitation is neither practical nor beneficial, rehabilitation remains vital in the complex management of longer-term stroke care, as it provides continuity from the formal rehabilitation intervention in the hospital setting. Longer-term rehabilitation is principally a community-based intervention, as it aims to assist the survivors to become more independent through social and leisure-based interventions. Available evidence is limited, with available studies heterogeneous and small in sample size. This review aims to look into the existing evidence, and discusses the feasibility and challenges in providing longer-term rehabilitation to stroke survivors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)239-245
Number of pages7
JournalReviews in Clinical Gerontology
Volume20
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2010

Fingerprint

Rehabilitation
Stroke
Survivors
Leisure Activities
Long-Term Care
Sample Size
Guidelines
Stroke Rehabilitation

Keywords

  • community
  • recovery
  • rehabilitation
  • stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Gerontology

Cite this

Long-term rehabilitation after stroke : Where do we go from here? / Abd Aziz, Noorazah.

In: Reviews in Clinical Gerontology, Vol. 20, No. 3, 08.2010, p. 239-245.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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