Long-term outcomes of Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Cochlear Implant Program among pediatric implantees

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Abstract

Objectives: Cochlear implant (CI) greatly enhances auditory performance as compared to hearing aids and has dramatically affected the educational and communication outcomes for profoundly deaf children. Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) pioneered CI program in 1995 in the South East Asia. We would like to report the long-term outcomes of UKM paediatric cochlear implantation in terms of: the proportion of children who were implanted and still using the device, the children's modes of communication, their educational placements, and their functional auditory/oral performance. We also examined the factors that affected the outcomes measured. Study design: This was a cross sectional observational study. Methods: Two sets of questionnaires were given to 126 parents or primary caregivers of the implantees. The first set of questionnaire contained questions to assess the children's usage of CI, their types of education placement, and their modes of communication. The second set of questionnaire was the Parent's Evaluation Of Aural/Oral Performance of Children (PEACH) to evaluate the children's auditory functionality. Results: Our study showed that among the implantees, 97.6% are still using their CI, 69.8% communicating orally, and 58.5% attending mainstream education. For implantees that use oral communication and attend mainstream education, their mean age of implantation is 38 months. This is significantly lower compared to the mean age of implantation of implantees that use non-oral communication and attend non-mainstream education. Simple logistic regression analysis shows age of implantation reliably predicts implantees (N = 126) would communicate using oral communication with odds ratio of 0.974, and also predict mainstream education (N = 118) with odds ratio of 0.967. The median score of PEACH rating scale is 87.5% in quiet, and this significantly correlates with an earlier age of implantation (r = −0.235 p = 0.048). Conclusions: UKM Cochlear Implant Program has achieved reasonable success among the pediatric implantees, with better outcomes seen in those implanted at the age of less than 4 years old.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)27-32
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
Volume105
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2018

Fingerprint

Cochlear Implants
Malaysia
Pediatrics
Communication
Education
Parents
Odds Ratio
Cochlear Implantation
Hearing Aids
Far East
Caregivers
Observational Studies
Ear
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Equipment and Supplies
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Cochlear implant
  • Education
  • Long term
  • Outcomes
  • Pediatrics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

@article{7e7dc5a75d06494e976d6153445c4d15,
title = "Long-term outcomes of Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Cochlear Implant Program among pediatric implantees",
abstract = "Objectives: Cochlear implant (CI) greatly enhances auditory performance as compared to hearing aids and has dramatically affected the educational and communication outcomes for profoundly deaf children. Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) pioneered CI program in 1995 in the South East Asia. We would like to report the long-term outcomes of UKM paediatric cochlear implantation in terms of: the proportion of children who were implanted and still using the device, the children's modes of communication, their educational placements, and their functional auditory/oral performance. We also examined the factors that affected the outcomes measured. Study design: This was a cross sectional observational study. Methods: Two sets of questionnaires were given to 126 parents or primary caregivers of the implantees. The first set of questionnaire contained questions to assess the children's usage of CI, their types of education placement, and their modes of communication. The second set of questionnaire was the Parent's Evaluation Of Aural/Oral Performance of Children (PEACH) to evaluate the children's auditory functionality. Results: Our study showed that among the implantees, 97.6{\%} are still using their CI, 69.8{\%} communicating orally, and 58.5{\%} attending mainstream education. For implantees that use oral communication and attend mainstream education, their mean age of implantation is 38 months. This is significantly lower compared to the mean age of implantation of implantees that use non-oral communication and attend non-mainstream education. Simple logistic regression analysis shows age of implantation reliably predicts implantees (N = 126) would communicate using oral communication with odds ratio of 0.974, and also predict mainstream education (N = 118) with odds ratio of 0.967. The median score of PEACH rating scale is 87.5{\%} in quiet, and this significantly correlates with an earlier age of implantation (r = −0.235 p = 0.048). Conclusions: UKM Cochlear Implant Program has achieved reasonable success among the pediatric implantees, with better outcomes seen in those implanted at the age of less than 4 years old.",
keywords = "Cochlear implant, Education, Long term, Outcomes, Pediatrics",
author = "Goh, {Bee See} and Noraziana Fadzilah and Asma Abdullah and Othman, {Basyariatul Fathi} and Cila Umat",
year = "2018",
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language = "English",
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T1 - Long-term outcomes of Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Cochlear Implant Program among pediatric implantees

AU - Goh, Bee See

AU - Fadzilah, Noraziana

AU - Abdullah, Asma

AU - Othman, Basyariatul Fathi

AU - Umat, Cila

PY - 2018/2/1

Y1 - 2018/2/1

N2 - Objectives: Cochlear implant (CI) greatly enhances auditory performance as compared to hearing aids and has dramatically affected the educational and communication outcomes for profoundly deaf children. Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) pioneered CI program in 1995 in the South East Asia. We would like to report the long-term outcomes of UKM paediatric cochlear implantation in terms of: the proportion of children who were implanted and still using the device, the children's modes of communication, their educational placements, and their functional auditory/oral performance. We also examined the factors that affected the outcomes measured. Study design: This was a cross sectional observational study. Methods: Two sets of questionnaires were given to 126 parents or primary caregivers of the implantees. The first set of questionnaire contained questions to assess the children's usage of CI, their types of education placement, and their modes of communication. The second set of questionnaire was the Parent's Evaluation Of Aural/Oral Performance of Children (PEACH) to evaluate the children's auditory functionality. Results: Our study showed that among the implantees, 97.6% are still using their CI, 69.8% communicating orally, and 58.5% attending mainstream education. For implantees that use oral communication and attend mainstream education, their mean age of implantation is 38 months. This is significantly lower compared to the mean age of implantation of implantees that use non-oral communication and attend non-mainstream education. Simple logistic regression analysis shows age of implantation reliably predicts implantees (N = 126) would communicate using oral communication with odds ratio of 0.974, and also predict mainstream education (N = 118) with odds ratio of 0.967. The median score of PEACH rating scale is 87.5% in quiet, and this significantly correlates with an earlier age of implantation (r = −0.235 p = 0.048). Conclusions: UKM Cochlear Implant Program has achieved reasonable success among the pediatric implantees, with better outcomes seen in those implanted at the age of less than 4 years old.

AB - Objectives: Cochlear implant (CI) greatly enhances auditory performance as compared to hearing aids and has dramatically affected the educational and communication outcomes for profoundly deaf children. Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) pioneered CI program in 1995 in the South East Asia. We would like to report the long-term outcomes of UKM paediatric cochlear implantation in terms of: the proportion of children who were implanted and still using the device, the children's modes of communication, their educational placements, and their functional auditory/oral performance. We also examined the factors that affected the outcomes measured. Study design: This was a cross sectional observational study. Methods: Two sets of questionnaires were given to 126 parents or primary caregivers of the implantees. The first set of questionnaire contained questions to assess the children's usage of CI, their types of education placement, and their modes of communication. The second set of questionnaire was the Parent's Evaluation Of Aural/Oral Performance of Children (PEACH) to evaluate the children's auditory functionality. Results: Our study showed that among the implantees, 97.6% are still using their CI, 69.8% communicating orally, and 58.5% attending mainstream education. For implantees that use oral communication and attend mainstream education, their mean age of implantation is 38 months. This is significantly lower compared to the mean age of implantation of implantees that use non-oral communication and attend non-mainstream education. Simple logistic regression analysis shows age of implantation reliably predicts implantees (N = 126) would communicate using oral communication with odds ratio of 0.974, and also predict mainstream education (N = 118) with odds ratio of 0.967. The median score of PEACH rating scale is 87.5% in quiet, and this significantly correlates with an earlier age of implantation (r = −0.235 p = 0.048). Conclusions: UKM Cochlear Implant Program has achieved reasonable success among the pediatric implantees, with better outcomes seen in those implanted at the age of less than 4 years old.

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KW - Education

KW - Long term

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