Liposomal delivery of antimicrobial agents in advances in liposome research

Claire Martin, Wan Li Low, Abhishek Gupta, Mohd Cairul Iqbal Mohd Amin, Iza Radecka, Prem Raj, Stephen Britland, Ken Kenward

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Chronic and slow/non-healing wounds require extensive management to reduce the repair and recovery time. Wound dressings and devices are often designed to suit varying wound characteristics and strategically manage the complexity of different wound types. The main challenges in managing the chronic wound environment include: delivery of sufficient antimicrobial agent to maintain bioavailability at biocidal concentrations control of the quantity of wound exudate whilst promoting/maintaining the availability of pro-healing factors reduction of the risk of uneven antimicrobial deposition, lowering the risk of localized toxicity improvement in the ease of antimicrobial and wound dressing application reduction of the frequency of dressing changes thus minimising patient discomfort and avoid risk opportunity for further infection Topical administration of agents can require penetration through dead matter, purulent exudates and scar tissue as well as the dermis, which serves as the first line of defence. The dermal barrier has low permeability to large hydrophilic entities but will selectively allow permeation of small lipophilic molecules. Whilst essential for maintenance of host homeostasis, this limited permeability dramatically restricts delivery of many antimicrobial agents both to the wound surface as well as into the various layers of the dermis. These issues can be reduced with the aid of controlled release drug delivery systems such as liposomes, which can improve targeting, efficacy and the biopharmaceutical properties of the antimicrobial agent. Liposomes are biocompatible, biodegradable, lipid bilayer vesicles with a large aqueous inner-core for encapsulation and delivery of active agents. Encapsulation of antimicrobial agents in liposomes provides protection from enzymatic and immunological inactivation. Additionally, the liposome's capacity to bind water may aid moisture retention, which promotes an environment that is highly conducive to tissue repair. The capacity to transport both hydrophilic and hydrophobic materials, has allowed a wide range of pharmaceutical formulations to be incorporated into liposome vesicles. In terms of encapsulation, agents with varying lipophilicities can be sequestered within the phospholipid bilayer (hydrophobic), entrapped in the inner core (hydrophilic), as well as in the inner and outer bilayer interface (hydrophilic) of the liposome. This ability of liposomes to encapsulate antimicrobial agents with a broad range of physicochemical properties makes them valuable in wound management applications. This chapter will examine the diverse antimicrobial payloads, including antibiotics, antifungals, natural products and essential oils, which are amenable to liposome delivery and show enhanced therapeutic outcomes. The advantages of liposome encapsulated antimicrobials are their potential to achieve effective drug delivery whilst reducing problems related to targeting, biodistribution and bioavailability of microbiocidal agents.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAdvances in Liposomes Research
PublisherNova Science Publishers, Inc.
Pages27-61
Number of pages35
ISBN (Print)9781631170775, 9781631170744
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2014

Fingerprint

Anti-Infective Agents
Liposomes
Wounds and Injuries
Research
Bandages
Encapsulation
Exudates and Transudates
Dermis
Biological Availability
Permeability
Repair
Tissue
Topical Administration
Drug Compounding
Lipid bilayers
Antifungal Agents
Lipid Bilayers
Risk Reduction Behavior
Volatile Oils
Drug Delivery Systems

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Martin, C., Low, W. L., Gupta, A., Mohd Amin, M. C. I., Radecka, I., Raj, P., ... Kenward, K. (2014). Liposomal delivery of antimicrobial agents in advances in liposome research. In Advances in Liposomes Research (pp. 27-61). Nova Science Publishers, Inc..

Liposomal delivery of antimicrobial agents in advances in liposome research. / Martin, Claire; Low, Wan Li; Gupta, Abhishek; Mohd Amin, Mohd Cairul Iqbal; Radecka, Iza; Raj, Prem; Britland, Stephen; Kenward, Ken.

Advances in Liposomes Research. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2014. p. 27-61.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Martin, C, Low, WL, Gupta, A, Mohd Amin, MCI, Radecka, I, Raj, P, Britland, S & Kenward, K 2014, Liposomal delivery of antimicrobial agents in advances in liposome research. in Advances in Liposomes Research. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., pp. 27-61.
Martin C, Low WL, Gupta A, Mohd Amin MCI, Radecka I, Raj P et al. Liposomal delivery of antimicrobial agents in advances in liposome research. In Advances in Liposomes Research. Nova Science Publishers, Inc. 2014. p. 27-61
Martin, Claire ; Low, Wan Li ; Gupta, Abhishek ; Mohd Amin, Mohd Cairul Iqbal ; Radecka, Iza ; Raj, Prem ; Britland, Stephen ; Kenward, Ken. / Liposomal delivery of antimicrobial agents in advances in liposome research. Advances in Liposomes Research. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2014. pp. 27-61
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