Lipid profile, apparent digestibility and protein efficiency ratio of sprague dawley rats fed with red palm fat diets

W. I. Wan Rosli, Abd. Salam Babji, Aminah Abdullah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Processed meat products, such as burgers, sausages, meatballs, salami and nuggets are currently popular with urban consumers. However, in general, they are high in cholesterol, total lipid and saturated fatty acids. Four beef burger formulations were prepared, each containing 15% fat from either beef fat (control), palm fat (PF), red PF or a blend of PF and red PF at a ratio of 1:1 at 15% fat. A rat assay was carried out to determine lipid profile, apparent digestibility (AD) and protein efficiency ratio (PER) of rats fed with beef burger diets containing palm based fats. Treatment with PF and red PF beef burger diets did not affect the total cholesterol concentration but resulted in higher HDL-cholesterol concentration in their blood serum. The rats fed with dried burger diets containing PF and red PF had higher AD value (90.0% and 89.3%, respectively) and was not significantly different (P < 0.05) compared to the group fed with dried burger containing beef fat (90.7) over the 10 days experimental diet period. PER values of all treatments except for casein were not significantly different (P < 0.05). There was also no difference (P < 0.05) in food intake and body weight gain between all rats fed with dried burger containing different types of palm based fats. In summary, the utilization of PF and red PF in beef burger increased the HDLcholesterol and had no effect on the concentration of total cholesterol in rat blood serum. Addition of palm based fats into beef burgers did not change AD and PER.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)153-160
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Food Research Journal
Volume14
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2007

Fingerprint

protein efficiency ratio
Sprague Dawley Rats
digestibility
Fats
Diet
Lipids
rats
lipids
diet
Proteins
beef
Cholesterol
fat red 7B
cholesterol
blood serum
Meat Products
Caseins
Red Meat
Serum
HDL Cholesterol

Keywords

  • Apparent digestibility
  • Beef burger
  • Cholesterol
  • Protein efficiency ratio

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science

Cite this

Lipid profile, apparent digestibility and protein efficiency ratio of sprague dawley rats fed with red palm fat diets. / Wan Rosli, W. I.; Babji, Abd. Salam; Abdullah, Aminah.

In: International Food Research Journal, Vol. 14, No. 3, 2007, p. 153-160.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wan Rosli, W. I. ; Babji, Abd. Salam ; Abdullah, Aminah. / Lipid profile, apparent digestibility and protein efficiency ratio of sprague dawley rats fed with red palm fat diets. In: International Food Research Journal. 2007 ; Vol. 14, No. 3. pp. 153-160.
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