Linkage and association studies in a Malaysian family with autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss.

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Abstract

Hearing loss is a common sensory deficit in humans. The hearing loss may be conductive, sensorineural, or mixed, syndromic or nonsyndromic, prelingual or postlingual. Due to the complexity of the hearing mechanism, it is not surprising that several hundred genes might be involved in causing hereditary hearing loss. There are at least 82 chromosomal loci that have been identified so far which are associated with the most common type of deafness--non-syndromic deafness. However, there are still many more which remained to be discovered. Here, we report the mapping of a locus for autosomal recessive, non-syndromic deafness in a family in Malaysia. The investigated family (AC) consists of three generations--parents who are deceased, nine affected and seven unaffected children and grandchildren. The deafness was deduced to be inherited in an autosomal recessive manner with 70% penetrance. Recombination frequencies were assumed to be equal for both males and females. Using two-point lod score analysis (MLINK), a maximum lod score of 2.48 at 0% recombinant (Z = 2.48, theta = 0%) was obtained for the interval D14S63-D14S74. The haplotype analysis defined a 14.38 centiMorgan critical region around marker D14S258 on chromosome 14q23.2-q24.3. There are 16 candidate genes identified with positive expression in human cochlear and each has great potential of being the deaf gene responsible in causing non-syndromic hereditary hearing loss in this particular family. Hopefully, by understanding the role of genetics in deafness, early interventional strategies can be undertaken to improve the life of the deaf community.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)23-33
Number of pages11
JournalThe Malaysian journal of pathology
Volume28
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2006

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Deafness
Hearing Loss
Lod Score
Genes
Penetrance
Malaysia
Cochlea
Haplotypes
Genetic Recombination
Hearing
Chromosomes
Parents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "Linkage and association studies in a Malaysian family with autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss.",
abstract = "Hearing loss is a common sensory deficit in humans. The hearing loss may be conductive, sensorineural, or mixed, syndromic or nonsyndromic, prelingual or postlingual. Due to the complexity of the hearing mechanism, it is not surprising that several hundred genes might be involved in causing hereditary hearing loss. There are at least 82 chromosomal loci that have been identified so far which are associated with the most common type of deafness--non-syndromic deafness. However, there are still many more which remained to be discovered. Here, we report the mapping of a locus for autosomal recessive, non-syndromic deafness in a family in Malaysia. The investigated family (AC) consists of three generations--parents who are deceased, nine affected and seven unaffected children and grandchildren. The deafness was deduced to be inherited in an autosomal recessive manner with 70{\%} penetrance. Recombination frequencies were assumed to be equal for both males and females. Using two-point lod score analysis (MLINK), a maximum lod score of 2.48 at 0{\%} recombinant (Z = 2.48, theta = 0{\%}) was obtained for the interval D14S63-D14S74. The haplotype analysis defined a 14.38 centiMorgan critical region around marker D14S258 on chromosome 14q23.2-q24.3. There are 16 candidate genes identified with positive expression in human cochlear and each has great potential of being the deaf gene responsible in causing non-syndromic hereditary hearing loss in this particular family. Hopefully, by understanding the role of genetics in deafness, early interventional strategies can be undertaken to improve the life of the deaf community.",
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