Left Atrial Volume Index Is an Independent Predictor of Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events in Acute Coronary Syndrome

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Abstract

Background: Left atrial volume index (LAVI) is well proven to be a reliable method of determining left atrial size, which has prognostic implications in cardiovascular diseases. Studies demonstrate that increased LAVI is a predictor of mortality in myocardial infarction, but its association with other major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs) among patients post acute coronary syndrome (ACS) has not been adequately evaluated. Methods: We calculated the baseline LAVI for all patients who were admitted with ACS between December 2010 and August 2011. The patients were stratified into 2 arms: normal LAVI and increased LAVI, with a cutoff value of 28 mL/m2. All patients were prospectively followed up during 6 months for development of MACEs. Results: Of the 75 patients who completed the study, 32 had increased LAVI, and 43 had normal LAVI. More than half (55%) of the patients were diagnosed with unstable angina. During the follow-up period of 6 months, 30 patients (93.8%) in the increased-LAVI arm and 23 patients (53.5%) in the normal-LAVI arm developed at least a single MACE. Patients with increased LAVI had significantly more MACEs (P = 0.021). The occurrence of MACE remained significantly higher in the increased-LAVI group even when atrial fibrillation was excluded (P = 0.016). After adjusting for confounding variables by multivariate analysis, LAVI was found to have a significant association with MACEs (P = 0.030, odds ratio = 1.229 (95% confidence interval, 1.020-1.481). Conclusion: LAVI is a useful tool for prognostication and an independent predictor of MACEs post ACS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)561-566
Number of pages6
JournalCanadian Journal of Cardiology
Volume28
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2012

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Acute Coronary Syndrome
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Unstable Angina
Atrial Fibrillation
Cardiovascular Diseases
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Myocardial Infarction
Confidence Intervals
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

@article{b1c960901e0445a485a1e573dc881417,
title = "Left Atrial Volume Index Is an Independent Predictor of Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events in Acute Coronary Syndrome",
abstract = "Background: Left atrial volume index (LAVI) is well proven to be a reliable method of determining left atrial size, which has prognostic implications in cardiovascular diseases. Studies demonstrate that increased LAVI is a predictor of mortality in myocardial infarction, but its association with other major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs) among patients post acute coronary syndrome (ACS) has not been adequately evaluated. Methods: We calculated the baseline LAVI for all patients who were admitted with ACS between December 2010 and August 2011. The patients were stratified into 2 arms: normal LAVI and increased LAVI, with a cutoff value of 28 mL/m2. All patients were prospectively followed up during 6 months for development of MACEs. Results: Of the 75 patients who completed the study, 32 had increased LAVI, and 43 had normal LAVI. More than half (55{\%}) of the patients were diagnosed with unstable angina. During the follow-up period of 6 months, 30 patients (93.8{\%}) in the increased-LAVI arm and 23 patients (53.5{\%}) in the normal-LAVI arm developed at least a single MACE. Patients with increased LAVI had significantly more MACEs (P = 0.021). The occurrence of MACE remained significantly higher in the increased-LAVI group even when atrial fibrillation was excluded (P = 0.016). After adjusting for confounding variables by multivariate analysis, LAVI was found to have a significant association with MACEs (P = 0.030, odds ratio = 1.229 (95{\%} confidence interval, 1.020-1.481). Conclusion: LAVI is a useful tool for prognostication and an independent predictor of MACEs post ACS.",
author = "Ramsamy Gunasekaran and Oteh Maskon and {Che Hassan}, {Hamat Hamdi} and Nazarudin Safian and Sakthiswary Rajalingham",
year = "2012",
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pages = "561--566",
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T1 - Left Atrial Volume Index Is an Independent Predictor of Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events in Acute Coronary Syndrome

AU - Gunasekaran, Ramsamy

AU - Maskon, Oteh

AU - Che Hassan, Hamat Hamdi

AU - Safian, Nazarudin

AU - Rajalingham, Sakthiswary

PY - 2012/9

Y1 - 2012/9

N2 - Background: Left atrial volume index (LAVI) is well proven to be a reliable method of determining left atrial size, which has prognostic implications in cardiovascular diseases. Studies demonstrate that increased LAVI is a predictor of mortality in myocardial infarction, but its association with other major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs) among patients post acute coronary syndrome (ACS) has not been adequately evaluated. Methods: We calculated the baseline LAVI for all patients who were admitted with ACS between December 2010 and August 2011. The patients were stratified into 2 arms: normal LAVI and increased LAVI, with a cutoff value of 28 mL/m2. All patients were prospectively followed up during 6 months for development of MACEs. Results: Of the 75 patients who completed the study, 32 had increased LAVI, and 43 had normal LAVI. More than half (55%) of the patients were diagnosed with unstable angina. During the follow-up period of 6 months, 30 patients (93.8%) in the increased-LAVI arm and 23 patients (53.5%) in the normal-LAVI arm developed at least a single MACE. Patients with increased LAVI had significantly more MACEs (P = 0.021). The occurrence of MACE remained significantly higher in the increased-LAVI group even when atrial fibrillation was excluded (P = 0.016). After adjusting for confounding variables by multivariate analysis, LAVI was found to have a significant association with MACEs (P = 0.030, odds ratio = 1.229 (95% confidence interval, 1.020-1.481). Conclusion: LAVI is a useful tool for prognostication and an independent predictor of MACEs post ACS.

AB - Background: Left atrial volume index (LAVI) is well proven to be a reliable method of determining left atrial size, which has prognostic implications in cardiovascular diseases. Studies demonstrate that increased LAVI is a predictor of mortality in myocardial infarction, but its association with other major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs) among patients post acute coronary syndrome (ACS) has not been adequately evaluated. Methods: We calculated the baseline LAVI for all patients who were admitted with ACS between December 2010 and August 2011. The patients were stratified into 2 arms: normal LAVI and increased LAVI, with a cutoff value of 28 mL/m2. All patients were prospectively followed up during 6 months for development of MACEs. Results: Of the 75 patients who completed the study, 32 had increased LAVI, and 43 had normal LAVI. More than half (55%) of the patients were diagnosed with unstable angina. During the follow-up period of 6 months, 30 patients (93.8%) in the increased-LAVI arm and 23 patients (53.5%) in the normal-LAVI arm developed at least a single MACE. Patients with increased LAVI had significantly more MACEs (P = 0.021). The occurrence of MACE remained significantly higher in the increased-LAVI group even when atrial fibrillation was excluded (P = 0.016). After adjusting for confounding variables by multivariate analysis, LAVI was found to have a significant association with MACEs (P = 0.030, odds ratio = 1.229 (95% confidence interval, 1.020-1.481). Conclusion: LAVI is a useful tool for prognostication and an independent predictor of MACEs post ACS.

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