Learning styles of university students

Implications for teaching and learning

Ruslin Amir, Zalizan Mohd Jelas, Saemah Rahman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Learning styles influence the way students learn and how they approach learning situations. Thus, understanding student learning styles is important in the quest to improve the effectiveness of student learning. This study aimed to examine learning styles among university students. A translated version of the Learning-Style Inventory was distributed to students undertaking natural-science, social science and professional courses. A total of 545 out of 600 questionnaires were returned. The inventory consists of 60 items using a seven-point Likert scale. Results indicated that students from different fields of study varied in learning style. The natural-science students were most dependent (Mean [M] = 5.17, SD =.64), whilst those taking professional courses were least dependent (M = 4.98, SD =.63). The social science students were the most participative (M = 5.20, SD =.87). The male students showed higher inclinations towards independence (M = 4.53, SD =.76) and avoidance (M = 3.57, SD =.84) in their learning styles, while the female students were found to be more participative (M = 4.60, SD =.73) and competitive (M = 5.15, S.D =.69). The implications of these findings are discussed in terms of university teaching and learning in ways that will accommodate different learning styles of students to improve student learning and promote lifelong learning.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)22-26
Number of pages5
JournalWorld Applied Sciences Journal
Volume14
Issue numberSPL ISS 2
Publication statusPublished - 2011

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Keywords

  • Learning styles
  • Teaching and learning
  • Teaching style
  • University student

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Learning styles of university students : Implications for teaching and learning. / Amir, Ruslin; Jelas, Zalizan Mohd; Rahman, Saemah.

In: World Applied Sciences Journal, Vol. 14, No. SPL ISS 2, 2011, p. 22-26.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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