Laparoscopic surgery in children is associated with an intraoperative hypermetabolic response

M. C. McHoney, L. Corizia, S. Eaton, A. Wade, L. Spitz, D. P. Drake, E. M. Kiely, H. L. Tan, A. Pierro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Laparoscopic surgery is thought to be associated with a reduced metabolic response compared to open surgery. Oxygen consumption (V̇O 2) and energy metabolism during laparoscopic surgery have not been characterized in children. Methods: We measured respiratory gas exchange intra-operatively in children undergoing 19 open and 20 laparoscopic procedures. Premature infants and patients with metabolic, renal, and cardiac abnormalities were excluded. Anesthesia was standardized. Unheated carbon dioxide was used for insufflation. V̇O2 was measured by indirect calorimetry. Core temperature was measured using an esophageal temperature probe. Results: We found a steady increase in V̇O2 during laparoscopy. The increase in V̇O2 was more marked in younger children and was associated with a significant rise in core temperature. Open surgery was not associated with significant changes in core temperature or V̇O2. Conclusions: Laparoscopy in children is associated with an intraoperative hypermetabolic response characterized by increased oxygen consumption and core temperature. These changes are more marked in younger children.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)452-457
Number of pages6
JournalSurgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques
Volume20
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Laparoscopy
Temperature
Oxygen Consumption
Indirect Calorimetry
Insufflation
Premature Infants
Carbon Dioxide
Energy Metabolism
Anesthesia
Gases
Kidney

Keywords

  • Core temperature
  • Indirect calorimetry
  • Laparoscopy
  • Metabolism
  • Oxygen consumption
  • Pediatric

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Laparoscopic surgery in children is associated with an intraoperative hypermetabolic response. / McHoney, M. C.; Corizia, L.; Eaton, S.; Wade, A.; Spitz, L.; Drake, D. P.; Kiely, E. M.; Tan, H. L.; Pierro, A.

In: Surgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques, Vol. 20, No. 3, 03.2006, p. 452-457.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McHoney, MC, Corizia, L, Eaton, S, Wade, A, Spitz, L, Drake, DP, Kiely, EM, Tan, HL & Pierro, A 2006, 'Laparoscopic surgery in children is associated with an intraoperative hypermetabolic response', Surgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques, vol. 20, no. 3, pp. 452-457. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00464-004-2274-4
McHoney, M. C. ; Corizia, L. ; Eaton, S. ; Wade, A. ; Spitz, L. ; Drake, D. P. ; Kiely, E. M. ; Tan, H. L. ; Pierro, A. / Laparoscopic surgery in children is associated with an intraoperative hypermetabolic response. In: Surgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques. 2006 ; Vol. 20, No. 3. pp. 452-457.
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AU - Corizia, L.

AU - Eaton, S.

AU - Wade, A.

AU - Spitz, L.

AU - Drake, D. P.

AU - Kiely, E. M.

AU - Tan, H. L.

AU - Pierro, A.

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