Labor law and immigrants: Legal impact to minority

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The influx of immigrants into Malaysia has been extraordinary in recent years. Their contributions to the physical development of this country have most likely been underpaid, undermined, and manipulated by private employers. This paper analyzes the labor law in Malaysia that grants more authority and security to private employers than to workers and their well being. The provisions in the Employment Act of 1955 limit immigrant workers from being defined and protected under this law. This study is qualitative in nature and uses content analysis to address the legal limitations, and an exploratory interview conducted randomly with forty (40) legal Indonesian immigrants to get some insights from legal immigrants' perspectives. As a result, this paper shares finding on the provisions in labor law, the limits of statutory language and definitions, the ineffective enforcement, and the underpinning problems that continuously make immigrant workers a deprived minority.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)52-62
Number of pages11
JournalAsian Social Science
Volume8
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Fingerprint

Labor and Law
immigrant
minority
labor law
worker
Malaysia
employer
physical development
grant
content analysis
well-being
act
Minorities
Labour law
Immigrants
Labour Law
Law
interview
language
Employers

Keywords

  • Inequality
  • Labor law
  • Legal immigrant
  • Malaysia
  • Policy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Arts and Humanities(all)
  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance(all)

Cite this

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title = "Labor law and immigrants: Legal impact to minority",
abstract = "The influx of immigrants into Malaysia has been extraordinary in recent years. Their contributions to the physical development of this country have most likely been underpaid, undermined, and manipulated by private employers. This paper analyzes the labor law in Malaysia that grants more authority and security to private employers than to workers and their well being. The provisions in the Employment Act of 1955 limit immigrant workers from being defined and protected under this law. This study is qualitative in nature and uses content analysis to address the legal limitations, and an exploratory interview conducted randomly with forty (40) legal Indonesian immigrants to get some insights from legal immigrants' perspectives. As a result, this paper shares finding on the provisions in labor law, the limits of statutory language and definitions, the ineffective enforcement, and the underpinning problems that continuously make immigrant workers a deprived minority.",
keywords = "Inequality, Labor law, Legal immigrant, Malaysia, Policy",
author = "{Aboo Talib Khalid}, Kartini and Hassan, {Kamal Halili} and {Mohamed Isa}, Suzanna and {Shaik Ahmad Yusoff}, Sakina and Chenorlia Mustafa",
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AU - Aboo Talib Khalid, Kartini

AU - Hassan, Kamal Halili

AU - Mohamed Isa, Suzanna

AU - Shaik Ahmad Yusoff, Sakina

AU - Mustafa, Chenorlia

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

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AB - The influx of immigrants into Malaysia has been extraordinary in recent years. Their contributions to the physical development of this country have most likely been underpaid, undermined, and manipulated by private employers. This paper analyzes the labor law in Malaysia that grants more authority and security to private employers than to workers and their well being. The provisions in the Employment Act of 1955 limit immigrant workers from being defined and protected under this law. This study is qualitative in nature and uses content analysis to address the legal limitations, and an exploratory interview conducted randomly with forty (40) legal Indonesian immigrants to get some insights from legal immigrants' perspectives. As a result, this paper shares finding on the provisions in labor law, the limits of statutory language and definitions, the ineffective enforcement, and the underpinning problems that continuously make immigrant workers a deprived minority.

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KW - Legal immigrant

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KW - Policy

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