Isolation of a Novel Molybdenum-reducing and Azo Dye Decolorizing Enterobacter sp. Strain Aft-3 from Pakistan

Mohd Shukri Shukor, Khan Aftab, Masdor Norazlina, Halmi Mohd Izuan Effendi, Siti Rozaimah Sheikh Abdullah, Shukor Mohd Yunus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Removing pollutants, such as heavy metals and organic dyes, using bioremediation is the most economical approach over the long term, when other methods, such as physical or chemical, may not be effective or feasible. The heavy metal molybdenum is toxic to ruminants and spermatogenesis in many animals, while dyes, including Methyl Red, are mutagenic to animals. In this study, we report on the ability of a molybdenum-reducing bacterium isolated from contaminated soil to decolorize the dye Methyl Red. The bacterium reduced molybdate to Mo-blue optimally between pH 5.8 and 6.5 and at 37°C. Glucose was the best electron donor for supporting molybdate reduction, followed by lactose, sucrose, maltose, raffinose, mucate, d-mannose, cellobiose, d-adonitol, d-mannitol, melibiose, glycerol, l-rhamnose, d-sorbitol, and l-arabinose, in descending order. Other requirements included a phosphate concentration at 5 mM and a molybdate concentration between 20 and 25 mM. The absorption spectrum of the Mo-blue produced was similar to that produced by previous Mo-reducing bacterium, and closely resembled a reduced phosphomolybdate. Molybdenum reduction was inhibited by mercury (ii), silver (i) and copper (ii) at 2 mg/L by 74.6, 67.0 and 63.3%, respectively. Biochemical analysis resulted in a tentative identification of the bacterium as Enterobacter sp. strain Aft-3. The ability of this bacterium to detoxify molybdenum and decolorize azo dye makes this bacterium an important tool for bioremediation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)95-114
Number of pages20
JournalChiang Mai University Journal of Natural Sciences
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2016

Fingerprint

Azo Compounds
Molybdenum
Bacteria
Coloring Agents
Bioremediation
Heavy Metals
Animals
Ribitol
Melibiose
Raffinose
Cellobiose
Rhamnose
Arabinose
Maltose
Sorbitol
Poisons
Mannitol
Lactose
Mannose
Mercury

Keywords

  • Azo dye
  • Bioremediation
  • Characterization
  • Enterobacter sp.
  • Microplate format
  • Molybdenum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Isolation of a Novel Molybdenum-reducing and Azo Dye Decolorizing Enterobacter sp. Strain Aft-3 from Pakistan. / Shukor, Mohd Shukri; Aftab, Khan; Norazlina, Masdor; Effendi, Halmi Mohd Izuan; Sheikh Abdullah, Siti Rozaimah; Yunus, Shukor Mohd.

In: Chiang Mai University Journal of Natural Sciences, Vol. 15, No. 2, 01.05.2016, p. 95-114.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shukor, Mohd Shukri ; Aftab, Khan ; Norazlina, Masdor ; Effendi, Halmi Mohd Izuan ; Sheikh Abdullah, Siti Rozaimah ; Yunus, Shukor Mohd. / Isolation of a Novel Molybdenum-reducing and Azo Dye Decolorizing Enterobacter sp. Strain Aft-3 from Pakistan. In: Chiang Mai University Journal of Natural Sciences. 2016 ; Vol. 15, No. 2. pp. 95-114.
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