Isolation and characterization of a molybdenum-reducing and SDS- degrading Klebsiella oxytoca strain Aft-7 and its bioremediation application in the environment

Norazlina Masdor, Mohd Shukri Abd Shukor, Aftab Khan, Mohd Izuan Effendi Bin Halmi, Siti Rozaimah Sheikh Abdullah, Nor Aripin Shamaan, Mohd Yunus Shukor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Masdor N, Shukor MSA, Khan A, Halmi MIE, Abdullah SRS, Shamaan NA, Shukor MY. 2015. Taxonomy and distribution of species of the genus Acanthus (Acanthaceae) in mangroves of the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, India. Biodiversitas 16: 238-246. Pollution as a result of anthropogenic activities is a severe global issue. These activities including inappropriate disposal, industrial and prospecting activities and unnecessary use of agricultural chemicals have triggered international initiatives to eliminate these contaminants. In this work we screen the ability of a molybdenum-reducing bacterium isolated from contaminated soil to grow and reduce molybdenum on various detergents. The bacterium was able to grow on SDS as a carbon source although the compound did not support molybdenum reduction. The bacterium reduces molybdate to Mo-blue optimally between pH 5.8 and 6.3 and between 25 and 34°C. Glucose was the best electron donor for supporting molybdate reduction followed by sucrose, d-mannitol, d-sorbitol, lactose, salicin, trehalose, maltose and myo-Inositol in descending order. Other requirements include a phosphate concentration between 5.0 and 7.5 mM and a molybdate concentration between 5 and 20 mM. The absorption spectrum of the Mo-blue produced was similar to previous Mo-reducing bacterium, and closely resembles a reduced phosphomolybdate. Molybdenum reduction was inhibited by mercury (ii), silver (i) and copper (ii) at 2 ppm by 62.1, 33.9 and 33.6%, respectively. Biochemical analysis resulted in a tentative identification of the bacterium as Klebsiella oxytoca strain Aft-7. The ability of this bacterium to detoxify molybdenum and degrade detergent makes this bacterium an important tool for bioremediation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)238-246
Number of pages9
JournalBiodiversitas
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Jun 2015

Fingerprint

Klebsiella oxytoca
Environmental Biodegradation
Molybdenum
molybdenum
bioremediation
Bacteria
bacteria
molybdates
Acanthaceae
detergents
Detergents
Acanthus
Andaman and Nicobar Islands
Agrochemicals
Trehalose
Maltose
Sorbitol
agrochemicals
Mannitol
Inositol

Keywords

  • Bioremediation
  • Isolation
  • Klebsiella oxytoca
  • Molybdenum
  • SDS

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Isolation and characterization of a molybdenum-reducing and SDS- degrading Klebsiella oxytoca strain Aft-7 and its bioremediation application in the environment. / Masdor, Norazlina; Abd Shukor, Mohd Shukri; Khan, Aftab; Bin Halmi, Mohd Izuan Effendi; Sheikh Abdullah, Siti Rozaimah; Shamaan, Nor Aripin; Shukor, Mohd Yunus.

In: Biodiversitas, Vol. 16, No. 2, 27.06.2015, p. 238-246.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Masdor, Norazlina ; Abd Shukor, Mohd Shukri ; Khan, Aftab ; Bin Halmi, Mohd Izuan Effendi ; Sheikh Abdullah, Siti Rozaimah ; Shamaan, Nor Aripin ; Shukor, Mohd Yunus. / Isolation and characterization of a molybdenum-reducing and SDS- degrading Klebsiella oxytoca strain Aft-7 and its bioremediation application in the environment. In: Biodiversitas. 2015 ; Vol. 16, No. 2. pp. 238-246.
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