Iron speciation in selected agricultural soils of peninsular Malaysia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The study discusses iron speciation in upland and lowland agricultural soils of Peninsular Malaysia. Generally, iron speciation in upland soils is influenced by the formation of iron oxyhydroxides and iron precipitates, due to intense chemical weathering processes. The bio avail ability of iron (easily leacheable and exchangeable, ELFE fraction) is very low and this could be attributed to its occurrence in the insoluble form. In the lowland soils, however, iron speciation varied widely due to varied soil composition, redox conditions and agricultural practices. Generally, soils in lowland regions are more clayey and silty compared to those in upland regions. The iron speciation in the Organic Oxizable (00) fraction is also higher, due to the higher organic carbon content in soils. As with upland soils, the biov ail ability of iron in the lowland soil is also very low. In riverine alluvial deposits, iron tends to accumulate in the RR fraction, followed by the 00 and Acid Reducible (AR) fractions. In the non-paddy areas, soils in the lowland region were found to be highly oxidized. Due to the shallow water table, these soils were exposed to the alternate submergence and exposure cycles during the wet and dry seasons respectively, resulting in the formation of iron and manganese mottles. Iron in these soils is concentrated mainly in the resistant fraction (RR), followed by the 00 fraction. Due to the high organic carbon content, iron in peat soils is fixed mainly by organic matter (00 fraction) but it also existed in the resistant form (RR fraction).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)154-165
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Environmental Science and Technology
Volume7
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

agricultural soil
iron
soil
organic carbon
upland region
peat soil
submergence
redox conditions
chemical weathering
agricultural practice
wet season
alluvial deposit
dry season
water table
manganese
shallow water
organic matter

Keywords

  • Agricultural soils
  • Iron speciation
  • Peninsular Malaysia introduction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Iron speciation in selected agricultural soils of peninsular Malaysia. / Jamil, Habibah; Jusoh, Khairiah; Sahid, Ismail; Kadderi, M. D.

In: Journal of Environmental Science and Technology, Vol. 7, No. 3, 2014, p. 154-165.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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