Investigating therapists' intention to use serious games for acquired brain injury cognitive rehabilitation

Ahmed Mohammed Elaklouk, Nor Azan Mat Zin, Azrulhizam Shapi`i

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Acquired brain injury is one cause of long-term disability. Serious games can assist in cognitive rehabilitation. However, therapists' perception and feedback will determine game adoption. The objective of this study is to investigate therapists' intention to use serious games for cognitive rehabilitation and identify underlying factors that may affect their acceptance. The respondents are 41 therapists who evaluated a "Ship Game" prototype. Data were collected using survey questionnaire and interview. A seven-point Likert scale was used for items in the questionnaire ranging from (1) "strongly disagree" to (7) "strongly agree". Results indicate that the game is easy to use (Mean = 5.83), useful (Mean = 5.62), and enjoyable (Mean = 5.90). However intention to use is slightly low (Mean = 4.60). Significant factors that can affect therapists' intention to use the game were gathered from interviews. Game-based intervention should reflect therapists' needs in order to achieve various rehabilitation goals, providing suitable and meaningful training. Hence, facilities to tailor the game to the patient's ability, needs and constraints are important factors that can increase therapists' intention to use and help to deliver game experience that can motivate patients to undergo the practices needed. Moreover, therapists' supervision, database functionality and quantitative measures regarding a patient's progress also represent crucial factors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)160-169
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of King Saud University - Computer and Information Sciences
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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Patient rehabilitation
Brain
Ships
Feedback
Serious games

Keywords

  • Brain damage
  • Game design
  • Perceptions
  • Rehabilitation
  • Serious games
  • Technology acceptance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science(all)

Cite this

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