Intraspecific genetic variability, differentiation and evolutionary relationships revealed through microsatellite loci in seven economically important Calamus species

Binoy Kurian, A. S. Hemanthakumar, Joemon Jacob, R Wickneswari V Ratnam, Chee Yen Choong, Prabalee Sarmah, S. Shefeek, Vishnu V. Nair, S. V. Sajithkumar, K. K. Sabu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Population density, species richness and critical population parameters are crucial in determining the levels of gene diversity in dioecious species of the genus Calamus. The extent of intraspecific and intrageneric genetic variability in Calamus from the southern Western Ghats of India was studied using 26 microsatellite markers by sampling 227 individuals belonging to seven economically important species. The heterozygosity of microsatellite loci ranged from zero to 0.78. Average gene diversity within species was 0.13; in all species it was 0.18 and amongst species was 0.06. The Shannon Information Index was the lowest for Calamus metzianus (0.11), whereas it ranged from 0.16 to 0.26 for other species. The expected heterozygosity varied from 0.08 to 0.18. Calamus hookerianus and Calamu travancoricus showed the highest genetic differentiation (44%) revealed through Fst values, whereas the lowest (22%) was observed between Calamus gamblei and Calamu thwaitesii. Population structuring and phylogenetic analysis differentiated the seven species. Due to overexploitation and loss of rare alleles, small populations could lead to fertilization between closely related individuals, resulting in inbreeding and increasing the risk of extinction. This could be important for species such as C. metzianus where allelic polymorphism was 23%, whereas for all other species it was 38% to 46%. Genetic diversity “micro-hotspots” were identified from the protected area network of the southern and central Western Ghats with highest observed heterozygosity. Four micro-hotspots from the Agasthyamalai Biosphere Reserve and the Pushpagiri Wildlife Sanctuary may be possible for long-term conservation programs. The findings of this study lay a strong foundation for strengthening protected area networks, especially areas with intermediate levels of disturbance.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Forestry Research
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

Fingerprint

Calamus
genetic differentiation
microsatellite repeats
genetic variation
loci
heterozygosity
conservation areas
species diversity
conservation programs
protected area
inbreeding
population density
extinction
genes
genetic polymorphism
gene
alleles
India
phylogeny
allele

Keywords

  • Calamus spp
  • Conservation
  • Differentiation
  • Genetic diversity
  • Microsatellites
  • Population structure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Forestry

Cite this

Intraspecific genetic variability, differentiation and evolutionary relationships revealed through microsatellite loci in seven economically important Calamus species. / Kurian, Binoy; Hemanthakumar, A. S.; Jacob, Joemon; V Ratnam, R Wickneswari; Choong, Chee Yen; Sarmah, Prabalee; Shefeek, S.; Nair, Vishnu V.; Sajithkumar, S. V.; Sabu, K. K.

In: Journal of Forestry Research, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Population density, species richness and critical population parameters are crucial in determining the levels of gene diversity in dioecious species of the genus Calamus. The extent of intraspecific and intrageneric genetic variability in Calamus from the southern Western Ghats of India was studied using 26 microsatellite markers by sampling 227 individuals belonging to seven economically important species. The heterozygosity of microsatellite loci ranged from zero to 0.78. Average gene diversity within species was 0.13; in all species it was 0.18 and amongst species was 0.06. The Shannon Information Index was the lowest for Calamus metzianus (0.11), whereas it ranged from 0.16 to 0.26 for other species. The expected heterozygosity varied from 0.08 to 0.18. Calamus hookerianus and Calamu travancoricus showed the highest genetic differentiation (44{\%}) revealed through Fst values, whereas the lowest (22{\%}) was observed between Calamus gamblei and Calamu thwaitesii. Population structuring and phylogenetic analysis differentiated the seven species. Due to overexploitation and loss of rare alleles, small populations could lead to fertilization between closely related individuals, resulting in inbreeding and increasing the risk of extinction. This could be important for species such as C. metzianus where allelic polymorphism was 23{\%}, whereas for all other species it was 38{\%} to 46{\%}. Genetic diversity “micro-hotspots” were identified from the protected area network of the southern and central Western Ghats with highest observed heterozygosity. Four micro-hotspots from the Agasthyamalai Biosphere Reserve and the Pushpagiri Wildlife Sanctuary may be possible for long-term conservation programs. The findings of this study lay a strong foundation for strengthening protected area networks, especially areas with intermediate levels of disturbance.",
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AU - Choong, Chee Yen

AU - Sarmah, Prabalee

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