Intracranial Complications of Chronic Otitis Media

Why Does It Still Occur?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Intracranial complications secondary to chronic otitis media (COM) include otogenic brain abscess and sinus thrombosis. Intravenous antibiotics and imaging have significantly reduced the incidence of intracranial complications secondary to COM. However, the same does not apply to a developing country like Malaysia, which still experiences persisting otogenic complications. This case series describes 3 patients with COM and intracranial complications. All 3 patients had COM with mastoiditis, with 1 of the 3 having a cholesteatoma. Postulated reasons for the continued occurrence include poor access to health care, poor compliance with medication, and the lack of pneumococcal vaccination during childhood. In conclusion, public awareness and a timely specialty referral can reduce the incidence of intracranial complications of COM.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEar, Nose and Throat Journal
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

Fingerprint

Otitis Media
Mastoiditis
Intracranial Sinus Thrombosis
Intracranial Thrombosis
Cholesteatoma
Brain Abscess
Health Services Accessibility
Medication Adherence
Malaysia
Incidence
Developing Countries
Vaccination
Referral and Consultation
Anti-Bacterial Agents

Keywords

  • chronic
  • ear
  • mastoiditis
  • otitis
  • pus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

@article{aa531df71c8e4b0e8276bc16558ba366,
title = "Intracranial Complications of Chronic Otitis Media: Why Does It Still Occur?",
abstract = "Intracranial complications secondary to chronic otitis media (COM) include otogenic brain abscess and sinus thrombosis. Intravenous antibiotics and imaging have significantly reduced the incidence of intracranial complications secondary to COM. However, the same does not apply to a developing country like Malaysia, which still experiences persisting otogenic complications. This case series describes 3 patients with COM and intracranial complications. All 3 patients had COM with mastoiditis, with 1 of the 3 having a cholesteatoma. Postulated reasons for the continued occurrence include poor access to health care, poor compliance with medication, and the lack of pneumococcal vaccination during childhood. In conclusion, public awareness and a timely specialty referral can reduce the incidence of intracranial complications of COM.",
keywords = "chronic, ear, mastoiditis, otitis, pus",
author = "Gendeh, {Hardip Singh} and Asma Abdullah and Goh, {Bee See} and Hashim, {Noor Dina}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0145561319840166",
language = "English",
journal = "Ear, Nose and Throat Journal",
issn = "0145-5613",
publisher = "Medquest Communications LLC",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Intracranial Complications of Chronic Otitis Media

T2 - Why Does It Still Occur?

AU - Gendeh, Hardip Singh

AU - Abdullah, Asma

AU - Goh, Bee See

AU - Hashim, Noor Dina

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Intracranial complications secondary to chronic otitis media (COM) include otogenic brain abscess and sinus thrombosis. Intravenous antibiotics and imaging have significantly reduced the incidence of intracranial complications secondary to COM. However, the same does not apply to a developing country like Malaysia, which still experiences persisting otogenic complications. This case series describes 3 patients with COM and intracranial complications. All 3 patients had COM with mastoiditis, with 1 of the 3 having a cholesteatoma. Postulated reasons for the continued occurrence include poor access to health care, poor compliance with medication, and the lack of pneumococcal vaccination during childhood. In conclusion, public awareness and a timely specialty referral can reduce the incidence of intracranial complications of COM.

AB - Intracranial complications secondary to chronic otitis media (COM) include otogenic brain abscess and sinus thrombosis. Intravenous antibiotics and imaging have significantly reduced the incidence of intracranial complications secondary to COM. However, the same does not apply to a developing country like Malaysia, which still experiences persisting otogenic complications. This case series describes 3 patients with COM and intracranial complications. All 3 patients had COM with mastoiditis, with 1 of the 3 having a cholesteatoma. Postulated reasons for the continued occurrence include poor access to health care, poor compliance with medication, and the lack of pneumococcal vaccination during childhood. In conclusion, public awareness and a timely specialty referral can reduce the incidence of intracranial complications of COM.

KW - chronic

KW - ear

KW - mastoiditis

KW - otitis

KW - pus

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85064922650&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85064922650&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0145561319840166

DO - 10.1177/0145561319840166

M3 - Article

JO - Ear, Nose and Throat Journal

JF - Ear, Nose and Throat Journal

SN - 0145-5613

ER -