Insight into biomass as a renewable carbon source for the production of succinic acid and the factors affecting the metabolic flux toward higher succinate yield

Jian Ping Tan, Jamaliah Md Jahim, Ta Yeong Wu, Shuhaida Harun, Byung Hong Kim, Abdul Wahab Mohammad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The current world demand for succinic acid is around 30000 tonnes per annum, which is forecast to expand 6-fold by 2015, owing to the introduction of biosuccinic acid. An insight into the practical usage of different biomass derivatives as substrates in the commercial bioproduction of succinic acid is discussed. Lignocellulosic crop stalk waste (corn straw, rice straw, and cotton straw) appears, in this case, to be the most promising form of biomass for commercial succinic acid fermentation. Another example of a low cost carbon source with high availability, crude glycerol, on the other hand, shows comparable potentials as a sustainable commercial carbon source for biosuccinic acid. In terms of the metabolic pathway of succinate-producing microbes, a greater availability of substrate CO2 and a lower oxidation/reduction potential (ORP) of the fermentation broth will trigger the microbial metabolic flux toward the generation of highly reduced metabolites (succinate) in order to regain an intracellular redox balance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)16123-16134
Number of pages12
JournalIndustrial and Engineering Chemistry Research
Volume53
Issue number42
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Oct 2014

Fingerprint

Succinic Acid
Biomass
Carbon
Fluxes
Straw
Acids
Fermentation
Availability
Regain
Substrates
Metabolites
Glycerol
Cotton
Crops
Derivatives
Costs
Oxidation-Reduction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Cite this

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abstract = "The current world demand for succinic acid is around 30000 tonnes per annum, which is forecast to expand 6-fold by 2015, owing to the introduction of biosuccinic acid. An insight into the practical usage of different biomass derivatives as substrates in the commercial bioproduction of succinic acid is discussed. Lignocellulosic crop stalk waste (corn straw, rice straw, and cotton straw) appears, in this case, to be the most promising form of biomass for commercial succinic acid fermentation. Another example of a low cost carbon source with high availability, crude glycerol, on the other hand, shows comparable potentials as a sustainable commercial carbon source for biosuccinic acid. In terms of the metabolic pathway of succinate-producing microbes, a greater availability of substrate CO2 and a lower oxidation/reduction potential (ORP) of the fermentation broth will trigger the microbial metabolic flux toward the generation of highly reduced metabolites (succinate) in order to regain an intracellular redox balance.",
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AU - Md Jahim, Jamaliah

AU - Wu, Ta Yeong

AU - Harun, Shuhaida

AU - Kim, Byung Hong

AU - Mohammad, Abdul Wahab

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