Insect succession on a decomposing piglet carcass placed in a man-made freshwater Pond in Malaysia

Heo Chong Chin, Mohamad Abdullah Marwi, John Jeffery, Baharudin Omar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Abstract. This entomological study was conducted in a man-made freshwater pond in a palm oil plantation in Tanjung Sepat, Selangor from 23 July 2007 by using pig (Sus scrofa) as a carcass model. A 1.5 month old piglet (5 kg), which died of asphyxia after being accidentally crushed by its mother, was thrown into a pond. Observation was made for ten days; one visit per day and climatological data were recorded. On the first two days, the piglet carcass sunk to the bottom of the pond. The carcass floated to the surface on the third day but no fly activities were seen. The blow fly, Chrysomya megacephala and Chrysomya rufifacies started to oviposit on the fourth day. Other than adult flies, a spider (Arachnida) was also observed on the carcass. Bubbles accumulated at the mouthpart, and the abdomen was greenish black. A lot of blow fly eggs were seen on the body surface on the fifth day (floating decay), along with first and second instars C. megacephala crawling under the piglet's skin. On the sixth day, adult blow fly, C. megacephala,and C. rufifacies,and muscid flies, Ophyra spinigera and Musca domestica were observed on to the carcass. High numbers of first and second instars of flies were observed wandering around the body surface with C. megacephala larvae being the predominant species. Two prominent maggot masses occurred on seventh and eighth days. Bloated deterioration stage began on day eighth exposing rib bones, humerus bones and intestines. Carcass was partially sinking and the maggot masses were at the water level. On day ninth, the carcass was partially sinking and three maggot masses were observed on the exposed surface. There were very few adult flies, including a scarab beetle was sighted on the carcass at this stage. The carcass along with the maggots sunk on day tenth, leaving an oily layer on the water surface.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)23-29
Number of pages7
JournalTropical Biomedicine
Volume25
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2008

Fingerprint

Malaysia
Fresh Water
Diptera
Insects
Larva
Arachnida
Houseflies
Sus scrofa
Spiders
Water
Asphyxia
Humerus
Beetles
Ribs
Abdomen
Eggs
Intestines
Swine
Mothers
Observation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Parasitology

Cite this

Insect succession on a decomposing piglet carcass placed in a man-made freshwater Pond in Malaysia. / Chin, Heo Chong; Marwi, Mohamad Abdullah; Jeffery, John; Omar, Baharudin.

In: Tropical Biomedicine, Vol. 25, No. 1, 04.2008, p. 23-29.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chin, HC, Marwi, MA, Jeffery, J & Omar, B 2008, 'Insect succession on a decomposing piglet carcass placed in a man-made freshwater Pond in Malaysia', Tropical Biomedicine, vol. 25, no. 1, pp. 23-29.
Chin, Heo Chong ; Marwi, Mohamad Abdullah ; Jeffery, John ; Omar, Baharudin. / Insect succession on a decomposing piglet carcass placed in a man-made freshwater Pond in Malaysia. In: Tropical Biomedicine. 2008 ; Vol. 25, No. 1. pp. 23-29.
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AB - Abstract. This entomological study was conducted in a man-made freshwater pond in a palm oil plantation in Tanjung Sepat, Selangor from 23 July 2007 by using pig (Sus scrofa) as a carcass model. A 1.5 month old piglet (5 kg), which died of asphyxia after being accidentally crushed by its mother, was thrown into a pond. Observation was made for ten days; one visit per day and climatological data were recorded. On the first two days, the piglet carcass sunk to the bottom of the pond. The carcass floated to the surface on the third day but no fly activities were seen. The blow fly, Chrysomya megacephala and Chrysomya rufifacies started to oviposit on the fourth day. Other than adult flies, a spider (Arachnida) was also observed on the carcass. Bubbles accumulated at the mouthpart, and the abdomen was greenish black. A lot of blow fly eggs were seen on the body surface on the fifth day (floating decay), along with first and second instars C. megacephala crawling under the piglet's skin. On the sixth day, adult blow fly, C. megacephala,and C. rufifacies,and muscid flies, Ophyra spinigera and Musca domestica were observed on to the carcass. High numbers of first and second instars of flies were observed wandering around the body surface with C. megacephala larvae being the predominant species. Two prominent maggot masses occurred on seventh and eighth days. Bloated deterioration stage began on day eighth exposing rib bones, humerus bones and intestines. Carcass was partially sinking and the maggot masses were at the water level. On day ninth, the carcass was partially sinking and three maggot masses were observed on the exposed surface. There were very few adult flies, including a scarab beetle was sighted on the carcass at this stage. The carcass along with the maggots sunk on day tenth, leaving an oily layer on the water surface.

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