Inkjet Printing of A Reactive Oxygen Species Scavenger for Flexible Bioelectronics Applications in Neural Resilience

Ashkan Shafiee, Elham Ghadiri, Muhamad Mat Salleh, Muhammad Yahaya, Anthony Atala

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Neural damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) can trigger several acute or chronic conditions such as Alzheimer's, Huntington's, and Parkinson's diseases. However, ROS scavengers hold great promise for enabling DNA repair in neurons; damaged cells grown on surfaces coated with ROS-scavenging agents may be able to recover their functionality and resilience. Nevertheless, the properties of such surfaces, as well as the scavenger deposition technique, may influence the ability of cells to properly adhere. Moreover, in bioelectronics for neural applications, thin films with adequate properties are crucial for the proper performance of an electronic device. Therefore, precise and reliable deposition techniques that can control the characteristics of thin films are imperative when fabricating bioelectronic devices integrated with cellular systems. To that end, inkjet printing is a promising method with unique advantages such as computer-assisted protocols and efficient consumption of materials. We report the printing of a functional electronic material that exhibits ROS scavenging behavior (Manganese [III] 5, 10, 15, 20-tetra [4-pyridyl]-21H, 23H-porphine chloride tetrakis [methochloride]) using a modified inkjet printer. Different printed pattern schemes that were designed based on the amount of overlap among sequential droplets were used to tune the surface morphology of the inkjet-printed thin films with a wide range of roughness (8.84 to 41.20 nm). Furthermore, post-printing processes (such as plasma treatment) reduced the contact angle of the surface to 20° to increase the adhesion of the damaged cells to the ROS scavenger thin film and enhanced their repair. Such inkjet printing methods of functional electronics materials that can simultaneously be used as ROS scavengers enhance the role of bioelectronics applications in neural studies.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2018 International Flexible Electronics Technology Conference, IFETC 2018
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
ISBN (Electronic)9781538633571
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 19 Dec 2018
Event2018 International Flexible Electronics Technology Conference, IFETC 2018 - Ottawa, Canada
Duration: 7 Aug 20189 Aug 2018

Other

Other2018 International Flexible Electronics Technology Conference, IFETC 2018
CountryCanada
CityOttawa
Period7/8/189/8/18

Fingerprint

resilience
printing
Printing
Oxygen
oxygen
Thin films
Scavenging
scavenging
thin films
chronic conditions
Repair
electronics
Parkinson disease
printers
cells
neurons
Neurons
Contact angle
Manganese
Surface morphology

Keywords

  • Inkjet printing
  • Neural damage
  • Reactive oxygen species scavenger

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Instrumentation

Cite this

Shafiee, A., Ghadiri, E., Mat Salleh, M., Yahaya, M., & Atala, A. (2018). Inkjet Printing of A Reactive Oxygen Species Scavenger for Flexible Bioelectronics Applications in Neural Resilience. In 2018 International Flexible Electronics Technology Conference, IFETC 2018 [8583903] Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1109/IFETC.2018.8583903

Inkjet Printing of A Reactive Oxygen Species Scavenger for Flexible Bioelectronics Applications in Neural Resilience. / Shafiee, Ashkan; Ghadiri, Elham; Mat Salleh, Muhamad; Yahaya, Muhammad; Atala, Anthony.

2018 International Flexible Electronics Technology Conference, IFETC 2018. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2018. 8583903.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Shafiee, A, Ghadiri, E, Mat Salleh, M, Yahaya, M & Atala, A 2018, Inkjet Printing of A Reactive Oxygen Species Scavenger for Flexible Bioelectronics Applications in Neural Resilience. in 2018 International Flexible Electronics Technology Conference, IFETC 2018., 8583903, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2018 International Flexible Electronics Technology Conference, IFETC 2018, Ottawa, Canada, 7/8/18. https://doi.org/10.1109/IFETC.2018.8583903
Shafiee A, Ghadiri E, Mat Salleh M, Yahaya M, Atala A. Inkjet Printing of A Reactive Oxygen Species Scavenger for Flexible Bioelectronics Applications in Neural Resilience. In 2018 International Flexible Electronics Technology Conference, IFETC 2018. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. 2018. 8583903 https://doi.org/10.1109/IFETC.2018.8583903
Shafiee, Ashkan ; Ghadiri, Elham ; Mat Salleh, Muhamad ; Yahaya, Muhammad ; Atala, Anthony. / Inkjet Printing of A Reactive Oxygen Species Scavenger for Flexible Bioelectronics Applications in Neural Resilience. 2018 International Flexible Electronics Technology Conference, IFETC 2018. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2018.
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