Inhaled Foreign Body Impaction: A Review of Literature in Malaysian Children

Balwant Singh Gendeh, H. S. Gendeh, S. Purnima, R. I. Comoretto, Dario Gregori, A. Gulati

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Foreign body aspiration in children is a problem that can lead to several complications, including death. In this retrospective publication review from 1970 to 2015, there were altogether 42 Malaysian children below the age of 15 y reported with foreign body (FB) ingestion. There were 31 boys and 11 girls between 2 and 177 mo of age. The incidence of FB ingestion in children varied with dietary practices. Peanut was the most common food-related substance inhaled followed by watermelon seed and coconut kernel. The most common non-food related substances were metal objects (toys, springs, hair clips) and plastic objects (ballpoint tips, pencil caps and whistles). Successful removal of FB by bronchoscopy is achieved in the vast majority of cases except for a case of impacted whistle inhalation and a neglected laryngeal FB which required a tracheostomy. One child required thoracotomy for the removal of a peanut in the right bronchus. The incidence of food-related substance inhalation was more common than non-food related substance (30:7). From this review, the key messages are two: first, prevention can be achieved by educating parents not to allow access to small objects or dangerous foods to children below 3 y age; Second, emergency first aid home measures, in the combination form of back blows in the head down position and chest or abdominal thrusts, should be early performed according to the pediatric age group and can be quite effective.

Original languageEnglish
JournalIndian Journal of Pediatrics
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 1 Jan 2019

Fingerprint

Foreign Bodies
Food
Inhalation
Heimlich Maneuver
Eating
Citrullus
Play and Playthings
Cocos
First Aid
Tracheostomy
Incidence
Bronchoscopy
Thoracotomy
Bronchi
Surgical Instruments
Hair
Plastics
Publications
Seeds
Emergencies

Keywords

  • Children
  • Choke
  • Food
  • Ingestion
  • Inhaled
  • Non-food

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Gendeh, B. S., Gendeh, H. S., Purnima, S., Comoretto, R. I., Gregori, D., & Gulati, A. (Accepted/In press). Inhaled Foreign Body Impaction: A Review of Literature in Malaysian Children. Indian Journal of Pediatrics. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12098-018-2824-8

Inhaled Foreign Body Impaction : A Review of Literature in Malaysian Children. / Gendeh, Balwant Singh; Gendeh, H. S.; Purnima, S.; Comoretto, R. I.; Gregori, Dario; Gulati, A.

In: Indian Journal of Pediatrics, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gendeh, Balwant Singh ; Gendeh, H. S. ; Purnima, S. ; Comoretto, R. I. ; Gregori, Dario ; Gulati, A. / Inhaled Foreign Body Impaction : A Review of Literature in Malaysian Children. In: Indian Journal of Pediatrics. 2019.
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