Information Received and Usefulness of the Sources of Information to Cancer Patients at a Tertiary Care Centre in Malaysia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Most people with cancer have a combination of treatments, such as surgery with chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. Providing good quality cancer-related information enables patients to be better prepared for treatment and improves their adherence. This study aimed to determine the level of information received and the perceived usefulness of the sources of information to cancer patients. A 4-month study was conducted at a day care oncology unit and oncology ward of a tertiary care centre in Malaysia using the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Information Module (EORTC QLQ-INFO 25). In total, 103 patients successfully completed the questionnaire. Level of information received was moderate. Patients were well-informed about medical tests (mean ± SD = 74.2 ± 17.8) followed by the disease itself (mean ± SD = 68.0 ± 13.6). Patients received less information on both other services (mean ± SD = 47.6 ± 18.1) and different places of care (mean ± SD = 41.3 ± 22.3). Although the correlation between age and level of information received was poor (r = − 0.201; P =.042), younger patients (≤ 65 years old) were found to have higher level of information received than older patients (mean ± SD = 61.5 ± 11.2 versus 57.8 ± 6.6; P =.046). Doctors (mean ± SD = 88.1 ± 17.1), nurses (mean ± SD = 83.7 ± 20.3), and family members (mean ± SD = 81.1 ± 24.9) were the most useful sources of information by cancer patients. There is still a need for improvement in the provision of information by the healthcare team and prioritisation should depend on patients’ individual characteristics and their needs of information. More attention is needed in delivering required information especially to older patients.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Cancer Education
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 1 Jan 2019

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Malaysia
Tertiary Care Centers
Neoplasms
Patient Care Team
Radiotherapy
Nurses
Quality of Life
Drug Therapy

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • EORTC QLQ-INFO 25
  • Information
  • Usefulness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

@article{3439a30c80f64e1a86ed6dd708eab82a,
title = "Information Received and Usefulness of the Sources of Information to Cancer Patients at a Tertiary Care Centre in Malaysia",
abstract = "Most people with cancer have a combination of treatments, such as surgery with chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. Providing good quality cancer-related information enables patients to be better prepared for treatment and improves their adherence. This study aimed to determine the level of information received and the perceived usefulness of the sources of information to cancer patients. A 4-month study was conducted at a day care oncology unit and oncology ward of a tertiary care centre in Malaysia using the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Information Module (EORTC QLQ-INFO 25). In total, 103 patients successfully completed the questionnaire. Level of information received was moderate. Patients were well-informed about medical tests (mean ± SD = 74.2 ± 17.8) followed by the disease itself (mean ± SD = 68.0 ± 13.6). Patients received less information on both other services (mean ± SD = 47.6 ± 18.1) and different places of care (mean ± SD = 41.3 ± 22.3). Although the correlation between age and level of information received was poor (r = − 0.201; P =.042), younger patients (≤ 65 years old) were found to have higher level of information received than older patients (mean ± SD = 61.5 ± 11.2 versus 57.8 ± 6.6; P =.046). Doctors (mean ± SD = 88.1 ± 17.1), nurses (mean ± SD = 83.7 ± 20.3), and family members (mean ± SD = 81.1 ± 24.9) were the most useful sources of information by cancer patients. There is still a need for improvement in the provision of information by the healthcare team and prioritisation should depend on patients’ individual characteristics and their needs of information. More attention is needed in delivering required information especially to older patients.",
keywords = "Cancer, EORTC QLQ-INFO 25, Information, Usefulness",
author = "Lew, {Yie Lin} and Fuad Ismail and {Abdul Aziz}, {Siti Azdiah} and {Mohamed Shah}, Noraida",
year = "2019",
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AU - Lew, Yie Lin

AU - Ismail, Fuad

AU - Abdul Aziz, Siti Azdiah

AU - Mohamed Shah, Noraida

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N2 - Most people with cancer have a combination of treatments, such as surgery with chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. Providing good quality cancer-related information enables patients to be better prepared for treatment and improves their adherence. This study aimed to determine the level of information received and the perceived usefulness of the sources of information to cancer patients. A 4-month study was conducted at a day care oncology unit and oncology ward of a tertiary care centre in Malaysia using the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Information Module (EORTC QLQ-INFO 25). In total, 103 patients successfully completed the questionnaire. Level of information received was moderate. Patients were well-informed about medical tests (mean ± SD = 74.2 ± 17.8) followed by the disease itself (mean ± SD = 68.0 ± 13.6). Patients received less information on both other services (mean ± SD = 47.6 ± 18.1) and different places of care (mean ± SD = 41.3 ± 22.3). Although the correlation between age and level of information received was poor (r = − 0.201; P =.042), younger patients (≤ 65 years old) were found to have higher level of information received than older patients (mean ± SD = 61.5 ± 11.2 versus 57.8 ± 6.6; P =.046). Doctors (mean ± SD = 88.1 ± 17.1), nurses (mean ± SD = 83.7 ± 20.3), and family members (mean ± SD = 81.1 ± 24.9) were the most useful sources of information by cancer patients. There is still a need for improvement in the provision of information by the healthcare team and prioritisation should depend on patients’ individual characteristics and their needs of information. More attention is needed in delivering required information especially to older patients.

AB - Most people with cancer have a combination of treatments, such as surgery with chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. Providing good quality cancer-related information enables patients to be better prepared for treatment and improves their adherence. This study aimed to determine the level of information received and the perceived usefulness of the sources of information to cancer patients. A 4-month study was conducted at a day care oncology unit and oncology ward of a tertiary care centre in Malaysia using the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Information Module (EORTC QLQ-INFO 25). In total, 103 patients successfully completed the questionnaire. Level of information received was moderate. Patients were well-informed about medical tests (mean ± SD = 74.2 ± 17.8) followed by the disease itself (mean ± SD = 68.0 ± 13.6). Patients received less information on both other services (mean ± SD = 47.6 ± 18.1) and different places of care (mean ± SD = 41.3 ± 22.3). Although the correlation between age and level of information received was poor (r = − 0.201; P =.042), younger patients (≤ 65 years old) were found to have higher level of information received than older patients (mean ± SD = 61.5 ± 11.2 versus 57.8 ± 6.6; P =.046). Doctors (mean ± SD = 88.1 ± 17.1), nurses (mean ± SD = 83.7 ± 20.3), and family members (mean ± SD = 81.1 ± 24.9) were the most useful sources of information by cancer patients. There is still a need for improvement in the provision of information by the healthcare team and prioritisation should depend on patients’ individual characteristics and their needs of information. More attention is needed in delivering required information especially to older patients.

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