Influence of co-morbidity on body composition changes after weight loss intervention among overweight housewives: A follow-up study of the MyBFF@home

Nur Shahida Abdul Aziz, Suzana Shahar, Rashidah Ambak, Noor Safiza Mohamad Nor, Ahmad Taufik Jamil, Tahir Aris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Obesity is a risk factor for co-morbidities such as diabetes, hypertension, osteoarthritis and cardiovascular diseases. However, it is unclear if the presence of co-morbidities has any effect on the magnitude of body composition changes following weight reduction programmes. Thus, this study aimed to determine changes in body composition among obese housewives with and without co-morbidities after they participated in a weight loss intervention. Methods: This is a follow-up study among 84 obese housewives without co-morbidities aged 18 to 59 years old who previously participated as a control group (delayed intervention, G1) in the My Body is Fit and Fabulous at Home (MyBFF@home) Phase II. Baseline data were obtained from 12 month data collection for this group. A new group of 42 obese housewives with co-morbidities (G2) were also recruited. Both groups received a 6 month intervention (July-December 2015) consisting of dietary counselling, physical activity (PA) and self-monitoring tools (PA diary, food diary and pedometer). Study parameters included weight, height, waist circumference, blood pressure and body compositions. Body compositions were measured using a bioelectrical impedance analysis device, Inbody 720. Descriptive and repeated measures ANOVA analyses were performed using SPSS 21. Results: There were reductions in mean body fat, fat mass and visceral fat area, particularly among obese women without co-morbidities. There were also decreases fat and skeletal muscle from baseline to month six with mean difference - 0.12 (95% CI: -0.38, 0.14) and visceral fat area from month three to month six with mean difference - 9.22 (- 17.87, - 0.56) for G1. G2 showed a decreasing pattern of skeletal muscle from baseline to month six with mean difference - 0.01(95% CI: -0.38, 0.37). There was a significant difference for group effect of visceral fat area (p < 0.05) with mean difference of - 11.49(95% CI: -20.07, 2.91). It showed that the intervention programs was effective to reduce visceral fat area compared to other part of body composition. Conclusion: Obese participants without co-morbidities showed more desirable changes in body composition. Visceral fat area was reduced regardless of morbidity status. Weight management efforts are therefore not as straightforward in those with co-morbidities compared to those without, and require thorough and tailor-made strategies for a better chance of success.

Original languageEnglish
Article number115
JournalBMC Women's Health
Volume18
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 19 Jul 2018

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Body Composition
Weight Loss
Morbidity
Intra-Abdominal Fat
Skeletal Muscle
Fats
Exercise
Weight Reduction Programs
Diet Records
Weights and Measures
Waist Circumference
Electric Impedance
Osteoarthritis
Adipose Tissue
Counseling
Analysis of Variance
Cardiovascular Diseases
Obesity
Blood Pressure
Hypertension

Keywords

  • Body composition
  • Co-morbidities
  • Housewives
  • Weight loss intervention
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Cite this

Influence of co-morbidity on body composition changes after weight loss intervention among overweight housewives : A follow-up study of the MyBFF@home. / Abdul Aziz, Nur Shahida; Shahar, Suzana; Ambak, Rashidah; Mohamad Nor, Noor Safiza; Jamil, Ahmad Taufik; Aris, Tahir.

In: BMC Women's Health, Vol. 18, 115, 19.07.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abdul Aziz, Nur Shahida ; Shahar, Suzana ; Ambak, Rashidah ; Mohamad Nor, Noor Safiza ; Jamil, Ahmad Taufik ; Aris, Tahir. / Influence of co-morbidity on body composition changes after weight loss intervention among overweight housewives : A follow-up study of the MyBFF@home. In: BMC Women's Health. 2018 ; Vol. 18.
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abstract = "Background: Obesity is a risk factor for co-morbidities such as diabetes, hypertension, osteoarthritis and cardiovascular diseases. However, it is unclear if the presence of co-morbidities has any effect on the magnitude of body composition changes following weight reduction programmes. Thus, this study aimed to determine changes in body composition among obese housewives with and without co-morbidities after they participated in a weight loss intervention. Methods: This is a follow-up study among 84 obese housewives without co-morbidities aged 18 to 59 years old who previously participated as a control group (delayed intervention, G1) in the My Body is Fit and Fabulous at Home (MyBFF@home) Phase II. Baseline data were obtained from 12 month data collection for this group. A new group of 42 obese housewives with co-morbidities (G2) were also recruited. Both groups received a 6 month intervention (July-December 2015) consisting of dietary counselling, physical activity (PA) and self-monitoring tools (PA diary, food diary and pedometer). Study parameters included weight, height, waist circumference, blood pressure and body compositions. Body compositions were measured using a bioelectrical impedance analysis device, Inbody 720. Descriptive and repeated measures ANOVA analyses were performed using SPSS 21. Results: There were reductions in mean body fat, fat mass and visceral fat area, particularly among obese women without co-morbidities. There were also decreases fat and skeletal muscle from baseline to month six with mean difference - 0.12 (95{\%} CI: -0.38, 0.14) and visceral fat area from month three to month six with mean difference - 9.22 (- 17.87, - 0.56) for G1. G2 showed a decreasing pattern of skeletal muscle from baseline to month six with mean difference - 0.01(95{\%} CI: -0.38, 0.37). There was a significant difference for group effect of visceral fat area (p < 0.05) with mean difference of - 11.49(95{\%} CI: -20.07, 2.91). It showed that the intervention programs was effective to reduce visceral fat area compared to other part of body composition. Conclusion: Obese participants without co-morbidities showed more desirable changes in body composition. Visceral fat area was reduced regardless of morbidity status. Weight management efforts are therefore not as straightforward in those with co-morbidities compared to those without, and require thorough and tailor-made strategies for a better chance of success.",
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AU - Shahar, Suzana

AU - Ambak, Rashidah

AU - Mohamad Nor, Noor Safiza

AU - Jamil, Ahmad Taufik

AU - Aris, Tahir

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N2 - Background: Obesity is a risk factor for co-morbidities such as diabetes, hypertension, osteoarthritis and cardiovascular diseases. However, it is unclear if the presence of co-morbidities has any effect on the magnitude of body composition changes following weight reduction programmes. Thus, this study aimed to determine changes in body composition among obese housewives with and without co-morbidities after they participated in a weight loss intervention. Methods: This is a follow-up study among 84 obese housewives without co-morbidities aged 18 to 59 years old who previously participated as a control group (delayed intervention, G1) in the My Body is Fit and Fabulous at Home (MyBFF@home) Phase II. Baseline data were obtained from 12 month data collection for this group. A new group of 42 obese housewives with co-morbidities (G2) were also recruited. Both groups received a 6 month intervention (July-December 2015) consisting of dietary counselling, physical activity (PA) and self-monitoring tools (PA diary, food diary and pedometer). Study parameters included weight, height, waist circumference, blood pressure and body compositions. Body compositions were measured using a bioelectrical impedance analysis device, Inbody 720. Descriptive and repeated measures ANOVA analyses were performed using SPSS 21. Results: There were reductions in mean body fat, fat mass and visceral fat area, particularly among obese women without co-morbidities. There were also decreases fat and skeletal muscle from baseline to month six with mean difference - 0.12 (95% CI: -0.38, 0.14) and visceral fat area from month three to month six with mean difference - 9.22 (- 17.87, - 0.56) for G1. G2 showed a decreasing pattern of skeletal muscle from baseline to month six with mean difference - 0.01(95% CI: -0.38, 0.37). There was a significant difference for group effect of visceral fat area (p < 0.05) with mean difference of - 11.49(95% CI: -20.07, 2.91). It showed that the intervention programs was effective to reduce visceral fat area compared to other part of body composition. Conclusion: Obese participants without co-morbidities showed more desirable changes in body composition. Visceral fat area was reduced regardless of morbidity status. Weight management efforts are therefore not as straightforward in those with co-morbidities compared to those without, and require thorough and tailor-made strategies for a better chance of success.

AB - Background: Obesity is a risk factor for co-morbidities such as diabetes, hypertension, osteoarthritis and cardiovascular diseases. However, it is unclear if the presence of co-morbidities has any effect on the magnitude of body composition changes following weight reduction programmes. Thus, this study aimed to determine changes in body composition among obese housewives with and without co-morbidities after they participated in a weight loss intervention. Methods: This is a follow-up study among 84 obese housewives without co-morbidities aged 18 to 59 years old who previously participated as a control group (delayed intervention, G1) in the My Body is Fit and Fabulous at Home (MyBFF@home) Phase II. Baseline data were obtained from 12 month data collection for this group. A new group of 42 obese housewives with co-morbidities (G2) were also recruited. Both groups received a 6 month intervention (July-December 2015) consisting of dietary counselling, physical activity (PA) and self-monitoring tools (PA diary, food diary and pedometer). Study parameters included weight, height, waist circumference, blood pressure and body compositions. Body compositions were measured using a bioelectrical impedance analysis device, Inbody 720. Descriptive and repeated measures ANOVA analyses were performed using SPSS 21. Results: There were reductions in mean body fat, fat mass and visceral fat area, particularly among obese women without co-morbidities. There were also decreases fat and skeletal muscle from baseline to month six with mean difference - 0.12 (95% CI: -0.38, 0.14) and visceral fat area from month three to month six with mean difference - 9.22 (- 17.87, - 0.56) for G1. G2 showed a decreasing pattern of skeletal muscle from baseline to month six with mean difference - 0.01(95% CI: -0.38, 0.37). There was a significant difference for group effect of visceral fat area (p < 0.05) with mean difference of - 11.49(95% CI: -20.07, 2.91). It showed that the intervention programs was effective to reduce visceral fat area compared to other part of body composition. Conclusion: Obese participants without co-morbidities showed more desirable changes in body composition. Visceral fat area was reduced regardless of morbidity status. Weight management efforts are therefore not as straightforward in those with co-morbidities compared to those without, and require thorough and tailor-made strategies for a better chance of success.

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KW - Co-morbidities

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