Indonesian immigrant settlements in peninsular Malaysia.

Kassim Azizah Kassim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

For over 2 decades, until the economic crisis in mid-1997, Malaysia's rapid economic growth attracted an influx of foreign labor, mostly from Indonesia, Bangladesh, and the Philippines. In 1997 the number of registered workers was estimated at 1.2 million and undocumented ones at approximately 800,000. The influx created various problems, of which housing is one of the most serious, especially in the Kelang Valley. This paper examines the ways and means by which Indonesian workers, the largest group among foreigners, overcame their accommodation problem. Two types of settlements are identified, that is, illegal ones in the squatter areas and legal ones, which are largely in Malay Reservation Areas. The settlements, which signify Indonesians' success in finding a foothold in Malaysia, today have become a base for more in-migration.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)100-122
Number of pages23
JournalSojourn (Singapore)
Volume15
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Malaysia
immigrant
worker
squatter
settlement pattern
Bangladesh
Philippines
economic crisis
accommodation
Indonesia
economic growth
housing
migration
labor
Group

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

Indonesian immigrant settlements in peninsular Malaysia. / Azizah Kassim, Kassim.

In: Sojourn (Singapore), Vol. 15, No. 1, 04.2000, p. 100-122.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Azizah Kassim, K 2000, 'Indonesian immigrant settlements in peninsular Malaysia.', Sojourn (Singapore), vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 100-122.
Azizah Kassim, Kassim. / Indonesian immigrant settlements in peninsular Malaysia. In: Sojourn (Singapore). 2000 ; Vol. 15, No. 1. pp. 100-122.
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