Indigenous peoples and parks in Malaysia: Issues and questions

Hood Salleh, Keith A. Bettinger

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction This chapter seeks to describe the relationship between indigenous peoples and several protected areas in Malaysia, namely Krau Wildlife Reserve, Taman Negara National Park, Endau Rompin National Park, Kinabalu National Park and Gunung Mulu National Park. These protected areas were chosen because they all illustrate various aspects of the relationship between protected areas and indigenous people. Krau Wildlife Refuge in Pahang is used by groups of Chewong and Jah Hut. These two groups live outside the park, but maintain a certain level of traditional ownership rights to the reserve. Taman Negara, covering parts of Pahang, Kelantan and Terenganu, is the home of a group of the Batek Negrito people. This case study describes the relationship of grudging tolerance on the part of the park administration towards a small and truly nomadic group of indigenous people. Endau Rompin National Park in Johor shows how indigenous people are currently employed in parks and conservation in Malaysia. The description of Gunung Mulu provides a portrait of the Eastern Penan, another hunter-gather group numbering about 400, who live in and have customary access rights to the park. This instance also reveals how the Sarawak Forestry Department (SFD) has handled an indigenous population residing within a protected area. Lastly, Kinabalu Park illustrates the treatment of indigenous people in the state of Sabah, in which indigenous groups have far more influence than any of the other states of Malaysia.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationBiodiversity and Human Livelihoods in Protected Areas: Case Studies from the Malay Archipelago
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages289-310
Number of pages22
ISBN (Print)9780511542169, 0521870216, 9780521870214
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

indigenous peoples
Malaysia
conservation areas
national parks
Borneo
Group Homes
right of access
Forestry
Ownership
Population Groups
ownership
Recreational Parks
forestry
case studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Salleh, H., & Bettinger, K. A. (2007). Indigenous peoples and parks in Malaysia: Issues and questions. In Biodiversity and Human Livelihoods in Protected Areas: Case Studies from the Malay Archipelago (pp. 289-310). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511542169.019

Indigenous peoples and parks in Malaysia : Issues and questions. / Salleh, Hood; Bettinger, Keith A.

Biodiversity and Human Livelihoods in Protected Areas: Case Studies from the Malay Archipelago. Cambridge University Press, 2007. p. 289-310.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Salleh, H & Bettinger, KA 2007, Indigenous peoples and parks in Malaysia: Issues and questions. in Biodiversity and Human Livelihoods in Protected Areas: Case Studies from the Malay Archipelago. Cambridge University Press, pp. 289-310. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511542169.019
Salleh H, Bettinger KA. Indigenous peoples and parks in Malaysia: Issues and questions. In Biodiversity and Human Livelihoods in Protected Areas: Case Studies from the Malay Archipelago. Cambridge University Press. 2007. p. 289-310 https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511542169.019
Salleh, Hood ; Bettinger, Keith A. / Indigenous peoples and parks in Malaysia : Issues and questions. Biodiversity and Human Livelihoods in Protected Areas: Case Studies from the Malay Archipelago. Cambridge University Press, 2007. pp. 289-310
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