Independent proprietorship and competition in distributed web search architectures

R. Khoussainov, T. O'Meara, A. Patel

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The predominant Web search model attempts to use multiple computers under centralised management to act as one search engine for the entire Web. As the quantity of online information increases, systems based on this model become prohibitively expensive for all but the largest organisations. We advocate the use of distributed search architectures where multiple independently owned and managed search engines act as one search system. This approach has significant advantages including low market entry cost for individual search providers and the potential to stimulate the provision of high-quality services through competition. The low entry cost allows small organisations and even individual users to influence service features and quality by establishing specialised search services. However, independent proprietorship also greatly complicates the search system design. The potential for competition between engines requires new approaches to effective engine management. Many new issues arise such as deciding what information an engine will index. In this paper, we analyse the sources of complexity in distributed Web search architectures with independent proprietorship and competition between engines. We outline possible ways to cope with this complexity using techniques from the field of computational economics such as game theory.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Engineering of Complex Computer Systems, ICECCS
EditorsS.F. Andler, M.G. Hinchey, J. Offutt
Pages191-199
Number of pages9
Publication statusPublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes
Event7th IEEE International Conference on Engineering of Complex Computer Systems - Skovde
Duration: 11 Jun 200113 Jun 2001

Other

Other7th IEEE International Conference on Engineering of Complex Computer Systems
CitySkovde
Period11/6/0113/6/01

Fingerprint

Engines
Search engines
Game theory
World Wide Web
Costs
Information systems
Systems analysis
Economics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science(all)
  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Khoussainov, R., O'Meara, T., & Patel, A. (2001). Independent proprietorship and competition in distributed web search architectures. In S. F. Andler, M. G. Hinchey, & J. Offutt (Eds.), Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Engineering of Complex Computer Systems, ICECCS (pp. 191-199)

Independent proprietorship and competition in distributed web search architectures. / Khoussainov, R.; O'Meara, T.; Patel, A.

Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Engineering of Complex Computer Systems, ICECCS. ed. / S.F. Andler; M.G. Hinchey; J. Offutt. 2001. p. 191-199.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Khoussainov, R, O'Meara, T & Patel, A 2001, Independent proprietorship and competition in distributed web search architectures. in SF Andler, MG Hinchey & J Offutt (eds), Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Engineering of Complex Computer Systems, ICECCS. pp. 191-199, 7th IEEE International Conference on Engineering of Complex Computer Systems, Skovde, 11/6/01.
Khoussainov R, O'Meara T, Patel A. Independent proprietorship and competition in distributed web search architectures. In Andler SF, Hinchey MG, Offutt J, editors, Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Engineering of Complex Computer Systems, ICECCS. 2001. p. 191-199
Khoussainov, R. ; O'Meara, T. ; Patel, A. / Independent proprietorship and competition in distributed web search architectures. Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Engineering of Complex Computer Systems, ICECCS. editor / S.F. Andler ; M.G. Hinchey ; J. Offutt. 2001. pp. 191-199
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