Increased solubility of plant core pulp cellulose for regenerated hydrogels through electron beam irradiation

Farah Nadia Mohammad Padzil, Sinyee Gan, Sarani Zakaria, Siti Fatahiyah Mohamad, Nor Hasimah Mohamed, Yung Bum Seo, Amanda V. Ellis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

High cellulose solubility is an essential to successful production of regenerated cellulose, from which hydrogels can be produced. Additionally, some pretreatment usually facilitates cellulose solubility. Bleached cellulose pulp from kenaf core (BK), consisting of lignin (0.3%), hemicellulose (5.2%) and ash (0%), was treated with an electron beam irradiation (EBI) at 10, 30, 50 and 70 kGy. The BK and irradiated bleached cellulose pulp (IK) were then dissolved in either sodium hydroxide/urea or lithium hydroxide/urea solvents which subsequently crosslinked with epichlorohydrin (ECH) solution to stabilize the formation of regenerated cellulose hydrogels. The amount of α-cellulose component in IK samples decreased as much as 38% and caused the viscosity average molecular weight (Mv) and degree of polymerization of IK samples to be reduced significantly by 84 and 87%, respectively. This resulted in an increase in cellulose solubility (up to 30%) for the IK samples in both solvent systems. However, this treatment resulted in a reduction in the overall cellulose fibre strength. X-ray diffraction of the hydrogels showed a transformation from cellulose I to amorphous cellulose. These hydrogels exhibited a higher degree of swelling, transparency and porosity compared to hydrogels prepared from non-irradiated pulp.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-14
Number of pages14
JournalCellulose
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 9 Jul 2018

Fingerprint

Hydrogels
Cellulose
Pulp
Electron beams
Solubility
Irradiation
Ashes
Urea
Epichlorohydrin
Sodium Hydroxide
Lignin
Transparency
Swelling
Lithium
Porosity
Molecular weight
Polymerization
Sodium
Viscosity

Keywords

  • Cellulose dissolution
  • Electron beam irradiation
  • Glycosidic bond
  • Ionizing radiation
  • Regenerated cellulose
  • Treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Polymers and Plastics

Cite this

Mohammad Padzil, F. N., Gan, S., Zakaria, S., Mohamad, S. F., Mohamed, N. H., Seo, Y. B., & Ellis, A. V. (Accepted/In press). Increased solubility of plant core pulp cellulose for regenerated hydrogels through electron beam irradiation. Cellulose, 1-14. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10570-018-1933-x

Increased solubility of plant core pulp cellulose for regenerated hydrogels through electron beam irradiation. / Mohammad Padzil, Farah Nadia; Gan, Sinyee; Zakaria, Sarani; Mohamad, Siti Fatahiyah; Mohamed, Nor Hasimah; Seo, Yung Bum; Ellis, Amanda V.

In: Cellulose, 09.07.2018, p. 1-14.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mohammad Padzil, Farah Nadia ; Gan, Sinyee ; Zakaria, Sarani ; Mohamad, Siti Fatahiyah ; Mohamed, Nor Hasimah ; Seo, Yung Bum ; Ellis, Amanda V. / Increased solubility of plant core pulp cellulose for regenerated hydrogels through electron beam irradiation. In: Cellulose. 2018 ; pp. 1-14.
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