Income distribution in East Asian developing countries: Recent trends

Ragayah Haji Mat Zin

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    18 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This paper updates estimates of the trends in income distribution in the eight countries of the developing East and Southeast Asian region. In the last update by Krongkaew (1994), inequality was found to be increasing in the newly industrialising economies of Hong Kong, Korea, Singapore and Taiwan, while in the ASEAN-4 (with the exception of Thailand) it was declining. Since then, the region has undergone the East Asian financial crisis of 1997-98. Recent data indicate that income distribution in Hong Kong and Taiwan continues to improve. Income inequality in South Korea declined until 1993 but began to increase slowly until the crisis sharply widened the disparity. The evidence for Singapore is mixed, with one set of estimates showing a dip in inequality while another indicates a widening of income disparity during the crisis. The crisis had the immediate impact of improving income distribution in all the ASEAN-4 countries, mainly because of reductions in the income shares of the top income groups. Later data show that inequality has since risen in all of them, except for Malaysia (for which no recent data are available).

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)36-54
    Number of pages19
    JournalAsian-Pacific Economic Literature
    Volume19
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Nov 2005

    Fingerprint

    income distribution
    developing world
    developing country
    income
    ASEAN
    trend
    Singapore
    Hong Kong
    Taiwan
    financial crisis
    difference in income
    dip
    South Korea
    Thailand
    Korea
    Malaysia
    Asia
    Income distribution
    Developing countries
    economy

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Geography, Planning and Development
    • Development

    Cite this

    Income distribution in East Asian developing countries : Recent trends. / Zin, Ragayah Haji Mat.

    In: Asian-Pacific Economic Literature, Vol. 19, No. 2, 11.2005, p. 36-54.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    @article{cc68eeb01bdd467c817eb32fd25b1087,
    title = "Income distribution in East Asian developing countries: Recent trends",
    abstract = "This paper updates estimates of the trends in income distribution in the eight countries of the developing East and Southeast Asian region. In the last update by Krongkaew (1994), inequality was found to be increasing in the newly industrialising economies of Hong Kong, Korea, Singapore and Taiwan, while in the ASEAN-4 (with the exception of Thailand) it was declining. Since then, the region has undergone the East Asian financial crisis of 1997-98. Recent data indicate that income distribution in Hong Kong and Taiwan continues to improve. Income inequality in South Korea declined until 1993 but began to increase slowly until the crisis sharply widened the disparity. The evidence for Singapore is mixed, with one set of estimates showing a dip in inequality while another indicates a widening of income disparity during the crisis. The crisis had the immediate impact of improving income distribution in all the ASEAN-4 countries, mainly because of reductions in the income shares of the top income groups. Later data show that inequality has since risen in all of them, except for Malaysia (for which no recent data are available).",
    author = "Zin, {Ragayah Haji Mat}",
    year = "2005",
    month = "11",
    doi = "10.1111/j.1467-8411.2005.00167.x",
    language = "English",
    volume = "19",
    pages = "36--54",
    journal = "Asian-Pacific Economic Literature",
    issn = "0818-9935",
    publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
    number = "2",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Income distribution in East Asian developing countries

    T2 - Recent trends

    AU - Zin, Ragayah Haji Mat

    PY - 2005/11

    Y1 - 2005/11

    N2 - This paper updates estimates of the trends in income distribution in the eight countries of the developing East and Southeast Asian region. In the last update by Krongkaew (1994), inequality was found to be increasing in the newly industrialising economies of Hong Kong, Korea, Singapore and Taiwan, while in the ASEAN-4 (with the exception of Thailand) it was declining. Since then, the region has undergone the East Asian financial crisis of 1997-98. Recent data indicate that income distribution in Hong Kong and Taiwan continues to improve. Income inequality in South Korea declined until 1993 but began to increase slowly until the crisis sharply widened the disparity. The evidence for Singapore is mixed, with one set of estimates showing a dip in inequality while another indicates a widening of income disparity during the crisis. The crisis had the immediate impact of improving income distribution in all the ASEAN-4 countries, mainly because of reductions in the income shares of the top income groups. Later data show that inequality has since risen in all of them, except for Malaysia (for which no recent data are available).

    AB - This paper updates estimates of the trends in income distribution in the eight countries of the developing East and Southeast Asian region. In the last update by Krongkaew (1994), inequality was found to be increasing in the newly industrialising economies of Hong Kong, Korea, Singapore and Taiwan, while in the ASEAN-4 (with the exception of Thailand) it was declining. Since then, the region has undergone the East Asian financial crisis of 1997-98. Recent data indicate that income distribution in Hong Kong and Taiwan continues to improve. Income inequality in South Korea declined until 1993 but began to increase slowly until the crisis sharply widened the disparity. The evidence for Singapore is mixed, with one set of estimates showing a dip in inequality while another indicates a widening of income disparity during the crisis. The crisis had the immediate impact of improving income distribution in all the ASEAN-4 countries, mainly because of reductions in the income shares of the top income groups. Later data show that inequality has since risen in all of them, except for Malaysia (for which no recent data are available).

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33745268455&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33745268455&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1111/j.1467-8411.2005.00167.x

    DO - 10.1111/j.1467-8411.2005.00167.x

    M3 - Article

    AN - SCOPUS:33745268455

    VL - 19

    SP - 36

    EP - 54

    JO - Asian-Pacific Economic Literature

    JF - Asian-Pacific Economic Literature

    SN - 0818-9935

    IS - 2

    ER -