In Situ Enzymatic Synthesis of Polar Lipid Emulsifiers in the Preparation and Stabilisation of Aerated Food Emulsions

Noor Soffalina Sofian Seng, Matt Golding, Kelvin Goh, Patrick Janssen, Sung Je Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

We report on the direct incorporation of a lipase derived from Rhizomucor miehei, into aeratable food emulsion formulations, with the objective of enzymatically generating polar lipid fractions during processing, and which are able to demonstrate equivalent functionality to chemically synthesised monoglycerides. Findings showed that the lipolysis of palm oil-in-water emulsions produced a combination of predominantly oleic monoglyceride and palmitic fatty acid fractions. The extent of hydrolysis was able to be controlled through concentration of enzyme, reaction time, and reaction temperature. Hydrolysis was terminated via inactivation of the enzyme through high heat treatment of emulsions. Emulsion properties, notably stability under shear, were seen to be highly dependent on the extent of lipolysis. When applied to model whipping and ice cream formulations, lipolytic generation of polar lipids was shown to promote both partial coalescence and fat globule adsorption to bubble surfaces, generating structures equivalent to those produced by use of commercial emulsifiers. Product properties, such as physical stability and material properties showed variation according to the extent of lipolysis. Our results demonstrated that enzymatic lipolysis of emulsions under controlled conditions could be optimised to deliver requisite droplet functionality for the structuring and stabilisation of aerated food emulsions. Findings are of significance, not only when considering the potential for replacement of chemically derived emulsifiers in such formulations, but also from the perspective that this approach can readily be incorporated into existing manufacturing process operations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)323-338
Number of pages16
JournalFood Biophysics
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2017

Fingerprint

emulsifiers
Emulsions
Lipids
emulsions
lipolysis
Stabilization
Lipolysis
Food
synthesis
lipids
monoacylglycerols
Monoglycerides
whipping cream
hydrolysis
Hydrolysis
Rhizomucor miehei
Enzymes
Rhizomucor
enzyme inactivation
fat globules

Keywords

  • Emulsion
  • Interfacial
  • Lipolysis
  • Partial coalescence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Bioengineering
  • Food Science
  • Biophysics
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

Cite this

In Situ Enzymatic Synthesis of Polar Lipid Emulsifiers in the Preparation and Stabilisation of Aerated Food Emulsions. / Sofian Seng, Noor Soffalina; Golding, Matt; Goh, Kelvin; Janssen, Patrick; Lee, Sung Je.

In: Food Biophysics, Vol. 12, No. 3, 01.09.2017, p. 323-338.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sofian Seng, Noor Soffalina ; Golding, Matt ; Goh, Kelvin ; Janssen, Patrick ; Lee, Sung Je. / In Situ Enzymatic Synthesis of Polar Lipid Emulsifiers in the Preparation and Stabilisation of Aerated Food Emulsions. In: Food Biophysics. 2017 ; Vol. 12, No. 3. pp. 323-338.
@article{da8bedf58d8b467a9bf5705a8bb0578f,
title = "In Situ Enzymatic Synthesis of Polar Lipid Emulsifiers in the Preparation and Stabilisation of Aerated Food Emulsions",
abstract = "We report on the direct incorporation of a lipase derived from Rhizomucor miehei, into aeratable food emulsion formulations, with the objective of enzymatically generating polar lipid fractions during processing, and which are able to demonstrate equivalent functionality to chemically synthesised monoglycerides. Findings showed that the lipolysis of palm oil-in-water emulsions produced a combination of predominantly oleic monoglyceride and palmitic fatty acid fractions. The extent of hydrolysis was able to be controlled through concentration of enzyme, reaction time, and reaction temperature. Hydrolysis was terminated via inactivation of the enzyme through high heat treatment of emulsions. Emulsion properties, notably stability under shear, were seen to be highly dependent on the extent of lipolysis. When applied to model whipping and ice cream formulations, lipolytic generation of polar lipids was shown to promote both partial coalescence and fat globule adsorption to bubble surfaces, generating structures equivalent to those produced by use of commercial emulsifiers. Product properties, such as physical stability and material properties showed variation according to the extent of lipolysis. Our results demonstrated that enzymatic lipolysis of emulsions under controlled conditions could be optimised to deliver requisite droplet functionality for the structuring and stabilisation of aerated food emulsions. Findings are of significance, not only when considering the potential for replacement of chemically derived emulsifiers in such formulations, but also from the perspective that this approach can readily be incorporated into existing manufacturing process operations.",
keywords = "Emulsion, Interfacial, Lipolysis, Partial coalescence",
author = "{Sofian Seng}, {Noor Soffalina} and Matt Golding and Kelvin Goh and Patrick Janssen and Lee, {Sung Je}",
year = "2017",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s11483-017-9488-1",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
pages = "323--338",
journal = "Food Biophysics",
issn = "1557-1858",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - In Situ Enzymatic Synthesis of Polar Lipid Emulsifiers in the Preparation and Stabilisation of Aerated Food Emulsions

AU - Sofian Seng, Noor Soffalina

AU - Golding, Matt

AU - Goh, Kelvin

AU - Janssen, Patrick

AU - Lee, Sung Je

PY - 2017/9/1

Y1 - 2017/9/1

N2 - We report on the direct incorporation of a lipase derived from Rhizomucor miehei, into aeratable food emulsion formulations, with the objective of enzymatically generating polar lipid fractions during processing, and which are able to demonstrate equivalent functionality to chemically synthesised monoglycerides. Findings showed that the lipolysis of palm oil-in-water emulsions produced a combination of predominantly oleic monoglyceride and palmitic fatty acid fractions. The extent of hydrolysis was able to be controlled through concentration of enzyme, reaction time, and reaction temperature. Hydrolysis was terminated via inactivation of the enzyme through high heat treatment of emulsions. Emulsion properties, notably stability under shear, were seen to be highly dependent on the extent of lipolysis. When applied to model whipping and ice cream formulations, lipolytic generation of polar lipids was shown to promote both partial coalescence and fat globule adsorption to bubble surfaces, generating structures equivalent to those produced by use of commercial emulsifiers. Product properties, such as physical stability and material properties showed variation according to the extent of lipolysis. Our results demonstrated that enzymatic lipolysis of emulsions under controlled conditions could be optimised to deliver requisite droplet functionality for the structuring and stabilisation of aerated food emulsions. Findings are of significance, not only when considering the potential for replacement of chemically derived emulsifiers in such formulations, but also from the perspective that this approach can readily be incorporated into existing manufacturing process operations.

AB - We report on the direct incorporation of a lipase derived from Rhizomucor miehei, into aeratable food emulsion formulations, with the objective of enzymatically generating polar lipid fractions during processing, and which are able to demonstrate equivalent functionality to chemically synthesised monoglycerides. Findings showed that the lipolysis of palm oil-in-water emulsions produced a combination of predominantly oleic monoglyceride and palmitic fatty acid fractions. The extent of hydrolysis was able to be controlled through concentration of enzyme, reaction time, and reaction temperature. Hydrolysis was terminated via inactivation of the enzyme through high heat treatment of emulsions. Emulsion properties, notably stability under shear, were seen to be highly dependent on the extent of lipolysis. When applied to model whipping and ice cream formulations, lipolytic generation of polar lipids was shown to promote both partial coalescence and fat globule adsorption to bubble surfaces, generating structures equivalent to those produced by use of commercial emulsifiers. Product properties, such as physical stability and material properties showed variation according to the extent of lipolysis. Our results demonstrated that enzymatic lipolysis of emulsions under controlled conditions could be optimised to deliver requisite droplet functionality for the structuring and stabilisation of aerated food emulsions. Findings are of significance, not only when considering the potential for replacement of chemically derived emulsifiers in such formulations, but also from the perspective that this approach can readily be incorporated into existing manufacturing process operations.

KW - Emulsion

KW - Interfacial

KW - Lipolysis

KW - Partial coalescence

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85020128045&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85020128045&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s11483-017-9488-1

DO - 10.1007/s11483-017-9488-1

M3 - Article

VL - 12

SP - 323

EP - 338

JO - Food Biophysics

JF - Food Biophysics

SN - 1557-1858

IS - 3

ER -