Impulse control behaviours in a Malaysian Parkinson’s disease population

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Abstract

Background: Impulse control behaviours are repetitive and excessive activities that may be sub-syndromal and not fulfil the criteria for impulse control disorder. These activities have potential to negatively impact on the daily lives of sufferers. We conducted a study to investigate the prevalence of impulse control behaviours and its associated features in Parkinson’s disease in our population. Methods: We conducted a prospective cross-sectional study on consecutive patients attending neurology clinic. Inclusion criteria include idiopathic Parkinson’s disease patients with Hoehn & Yahr stage I-IV. Eighty patients were enrolled and screened for impulse control behaviours using the Questionnaire for Impulsive-Compulsive Disorder for Parkinson’s disease (QUIP). Results: Prevalence of impulse control behaviours among our cohort was 11.3%; the features significantly associated with it were higher level of education (p=0.02), advanced stage of disease (p=0.03) and higher levodopa dosage (p= 0.01). The commonest impulse control behaviour in our cohort was compulsive medication use (7.5%), followed by hobbyism (6.3%), hypersexuality (5%), compulsive buying (3.75%), punding (2.5%), walkabout (2.5%), compulsive eating (1.25%) and pathological gambling (1.3%). Conclusions: There is an association between impulse control behaviour and higher levodopa dosage in a study on patients with Parkinson’s disease in Malaysia. We also found a low prevalence of pathological gambling as compared to studies performed in the West.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)137-143
Number of pages7
JournalNeurology Asia
Volume21
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2016

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Behavior Control
Parkinson Disease
Population
Gambling
Levodopa
Disruptive, Impulse Control, and Conduct Disorders
Malaysia
Neurology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Eating
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

Cite this

@article{0e41cabea1fd40cc8cc99d1874f90a5c,
title = "Impulse control behaviours in a Malaysian Parkinson’s disease population",
abstract = "Background: Impulse control behaviours are repetitive and excessive activities that may be sub-syndromal and not fulfil the criteria for impulse control disorder. These activities have potential to negatively impact on the daily lives of sufferers. We conducted a study to investigate the prevalence of impulse control behaviours and its associated features in Parkinson’s disease in our population. Methods: We conducted a prospective cross-sectional study on consecutive patients attending neurology clinic. Inclusion criteria include idiopathic Parkinson’s disease patients with Hoehn & Yahr stage I-IV. Eighty patients were enrolled and screened for impulse control behaviours using the Questionnaire for Impulsive-Compulsive Disorder for Parkinson’s disease (QUIP). Results: Prevalence of impulse control behaviours among our cohort was 11.3{\%}; the features significantly associated with it were higher level of education (p=0.02), advanced stage of disease (p=0.03) and higher levodopa dosage (p= 0.01). The commonest impulse control behaviour in our cohort was compulsive medication use (7.5{\%}), followed by hobbyism (6.3{\%}), hypersexuality (5{\%}), compulsive buying (3.75{\%}), punding (2.5{\%}), walkabout (2.5{\%}), compulsive eating (1.25{\%}) and pathological gambling (1.3{\%}). Conclusions: There is an association between impulse control behaviour and higher levodopa dosage in a study on patients with Parkinson’s disease in Malaysia. We also found a low prevalence of pathological gambling as compared to studies performed in the West.",
author = "{Md. Rani}, {Shahrul Azmin} and Tan, {Eng Liang} and {Nik Jaafar}, {Nik Ruzyanei} and Hazli Zakaria and {Mohammed Nawi}, Azmawati and Law, {Zhe Kang} and Rabani Remli and {Wan Yahya}, {Wan Nur Nafisah} and Ramesh Sahathevan and Tan, {Hui Jan} and {Pakarul Razy}, {Nur Fadhlina M} and {Abdul Murad}, {Nor Azian} and Ling, {King Hwa} and {Mohamed Ibrahim}, Norlinah",
year = "2016",
month = "6",
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "21",
pages = "137--143",
journal = "Neurology Asia",
issn = "1823-6138",
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T1 - Impulse control behaviours in a Malaysian Parkinson’s disease population

AU - Md. Rani, Shahrul Azmin

AU - Tan, Eng Liang

AU - Nik Jaafar, Nik Ruzyanei

AU - Zakaria, Hazli

AU - Mohammed Nawi, Azmawati

AU - Law, Zhe Kang

AU - Remli, Rabani

AU - Wan Yahya, Wan Nur Nafisah

AU - Sahathevan, Ramesh

AU - Tan, Hui Jan

AU - Pakarul Razy, Nur Fadhlina M

AU - Abdul Murad, Nor Azian

AU - Ling, King Hwa

AU - Mohamed Ibrahim, Norlinah

PY - 2016/6/1

Y1 - 2016/6/1

N2 - Background: Impulse control behaviours are repetitive and excessive activities that may be sub-syndromal and not fulfil the criteria for impulse control disorder. These activities have potential to negatively impact on the daily lives of sufferers. We conducted a study to investigate the prevalence of impulse control behaviours and its associated features in Parkinson’s disease in our population. Methods: We conducted a prospective cross-sectional study on consecutive patients attending neurology clinic. Inclusion criteria include idiopathic Parkinson’s disease patients with Hoehn & Yahr stage I-IV. Eighty patients were enrolled and screened for impulse control behaviours using the Questionnaire for Impulsive-Compulsive Disorder for Parkinson’s disease (QUIP). Results: Prevalence of impulse control behaviours among our cohort was 11.3%; the features significantly associated with it were higher level of education (p=0.02), advanced stage of disease (p=0.03) and higher levodopa dosage (p= 0.01). The commonest impulse control behaviour in our cohort was compulsive medication use (7.5%), followed by hobbyism (6.3%), hypersexuality (5%), compulsive buying (3.75%), punding (2.5%), walkabout (2.5%), compulsive eating (1.25%) and pathological gambling (1.3%). Conclusions: There is an association between impulse control behaviour and higher levodopa dosage in a study on patients with Parkinson’s disease in Malaysia. We also found a low prevalence of pathological gambling as compared to studies performed in the West.

AB - Background: Impulse control behaviours are repetitive and excessive activities that may be sub-syndromal and not fulfil the criteria for impulse control disorder. These activities have potential to negatively impact on the daily lives of sufferers. We conducted a study to investigate the prevalence of impulse control behaviours and its associated features in Parkinson’s disease in our population. Methods: We conducted a prospective cross-sectional study on consecutive patients attending neurology clinic. Inclusion criteria include idiopathic Parkinson’s disease patients with Hoehn & Yahr stage I-IV. Eighty patients were enrolled and screened for impulse control behaviours using the Questionnaire for Impulsive-Compulsive Disorder for Parkinson’s disease (QUIP). Results: Prevalence of impulse control behaviours among our cohort was 11.3%; the features significantly associated with it were higher level of education (p=0.02), advanced stage of disease (p=0.03) and higher levodopa dosage (p= 0.01). The commonest impulse control behaviour in our cohort was compulsive medication use (7.5%), followed by hobbyism (6.3%), hypersexuality (5%), compulsive buying (3.75%), punding (2.5%), walkabout (2.5%), compulsive eating (1.25%) and pathological gambling (1.3%). Conclusions: There is an association between impulse control behaviour and higher levodopa dosage in a study on patients with Parkinson’s disease in Malaysia. We also found a low prevalence of pathological gambling as compared to studies performed in the West.

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SN - 1823-6138

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