Improvement of dietary quality with the aid of a low glycemic index diet in Asian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

Mohd Yusof Barakatun Nisak, Ruzita Abd. Talib, Norimah A. Karim, Heather Gilbertson, Nor Azmi Kamaruddin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: This randomized controlled study was conducted to determine the effect of low glycemic index (GI) dietary advice on eating patterns and dietary quality in Asian patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Methods: Asian patients with T2DM (N = 104) were randomized into 2 groups that received either low GI or conventional carbohydrate exchange (CCE) dietary advice for 12 weeks. Nutritional prescriptions were based on the medical nutrition therapy for T2DM, with the difference being in the GI component of the carbohydrates. Dietary intake and food choices were assessed with the use of a 3-day food record. Results: At week 12, both groups achieved the recommendations for carbohydrate (52 ± 4% and 54 ± 4% of energy) and fat (30 ± 4% and 28 ± 5% of energy) intake. There were no significant differences in the reported macronutrient intake in both groups. With the low GI diet, crude fiber and dietary calcium intake increased, while the dietary GI reduced. Subjects in the lowest dietary glycemic index/glycemic load (GI/GL) quartile consumed more parboiled/basmati rice, pasta, milk/dairy products, fruits, and dough, which are foods from the low GI category. There was a significant reduction in the hemoglobin A1c level at week 12 for patients in the lowest GI/GL quartile (Δ = 20.7 ± 0.1%) compared with those in the highest GI/GL quartile (Δ = 20.1 ± 0.2%). Conclusions: These results demonstrate the ability of low GI dietary advice to improve the dietary quality of Asian patients with T2DM.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)161-170
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the American College of Nutrition
Volume29
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Glycemic Index
Quality Improvement
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Diet
Eating
Carbohydrates
Nutrition Therapy
Dietary Carbohydrates
Dietary Calcium
Food
Dairy Products
Energy Intake
Prescriptions
Fruit
Milk
Hemoglobins
Fats

Keywords

  • Asian
  • Carbohydrate exchanges
  • Dietary quality
  • Glycemic control
  • Glycemic index
  • Glycemic load
  • Type 2 diabetes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

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title = "Improvement of dietary quality with the aid of a low glycemic index diet in Asian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus",
abstract = "Objectives: This randomized controlled study was conducted to determine the effect of low glycemic index (GI) dietary advice on eating patterns and dietary quality in Asian patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Methods: Asian patients with T2DM (N = 104) were randomized into 2 groups that received either low GI or conventional carbohydrate exchange (CCE) dietary advice for 12 weeks. Nutritional prescriptions were based on the medical nutrition therapy for T2DM, with the difference being in the GI component of the carbohydrates. Dietary intake and food choices were assessed with the use of a 3-day food record. Results: At week 12, both groups achieved the recommendations for carbohydrate (52 ± 4{\%} and 54 ± 4{\%} of energy) and fat (30 ± 4{\%} and 28 ± 5{\%} of energy) intake. There were no significant differences in the reported macronutrient intake in both groups. With the low GI diet, crude fiber and dietary calcium intake increased, while the dietary GI reduced. Subjects in the lowest dietary glycemic index/glycemic load (GI/GL) quartile consumed more parboiled/basmati rice, pasta, milk/dairy products, fruits, and dough, which are foods from the low GI category. There was a significant reduction in the hemoglobin A1c level at week 12 for patients in the lowest GI/GL quartile (Δ = 20.7 ± 0.1{\%}) compared with those in the highest GI/GL quartile (Δ = 20.1 ± 0.2{\%}). Conclusions: These results demonstrate the ability of low GI dietary advice to improve the dietary quality of Asian patients with T2DM.",
keywords = "Asian, Carbohydrate exchanges, Dietary quality, Glycemic control, Glycemic index, Glycemic load, Type 2 diabetes",
author = "Nisak, {Mohd Yusof Barakatun} and {Abd. Talib}, Ruzita and {A. Karim}, Norimah and Heather Gilbertson and Kamaruddin, {Nor Azmi}",
year = "2010",
month = "6",
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journal = "Journal of the American College of Nutrition",
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T1 - Improvement of dietary quality with the aid of a low glycemic index diet in Asian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

AU - Nisak, Mohd Yusof Barakatun

AU - Abd. Talib, Ruzita

AU - A. Karim, Norimah

AU - Gilbertson, Heather

AU - Kamaruddin, Nor Azmi

PY - 2010/6

Y1 - 2010/6

N2 - Objectives: This randomized controlled study was conducted to determine the effect of low glycemic index (GI) dietary advice on eating patterns and dietary quality in Asian patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Methods: Asian patients with T2DM (N = 104) were randomized into 2 groups that received either low GI or conventional carbohydrate exchange (CCE) dietary advice for 12 weeks. Nutritional prescriptions were based on the medical nutrition therapy for T2DM, with the difference being in the GI component of the carbohydrates. Dietary intake and food choices were assessed with the use of a 3-day food record. Results: At week 12, both groups achieved the recommendations for carbohydrate (52 ± 4% and 54 ± 4% of energy) and fat (30 ± 4% and 28 ± 5% of energy) intake. There were no significant differences in the reported macronutrient intake in both groups. With the low GI diet, crude fiber and dietary calcium intake increased, while the dietary GI reduced. Subjects in the lowest dietary glycemic index/glycemic load (GI/GL) quartile consumed more parboiled/basmati rice, pasta, milk/dairy products, fruits, and dough, which are foods from the low GI category. There was a significant reduction in the hemoglobin A1c level at week 12 for patients in the lowest GI/GL quartile (Δ = 20.7 ± 0.1%) compared with those in the highest GI/GL quartile (Δ = 20.1 ± 0.2%). Conclusions: These results demonstrate the ability of low GI dietary advice to improve the dietary quality of Asian patients with T2DM.

AB - Objectives: This randomized controlled study was conducted to determine the effect of low glycemic index (GI) dietary advice on eating patterns and dietary quality in Asian patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Methods: Asian patients with T2DM (N = 104) were randomized into 2 groups that received either low GI or conventional carbohydrate exchange (CCE) dietary advice for 12 weeks. Nutritional prescriptions were based on the medical nutrition therapy for T2DM, with the difference being in the GI component of the carbohydrates. Dietary intake and food choices were assessed with the use of a 3-day food record. Results: At week 12, both groups achieved the recommendations for carbohydrate (52 ± 4% and 54 ± 4% of energy) and fat (30 ± 4% and 28 ± 5% of energy) intake. There were no significant differences in the reported macronutrient intake in both groups. With the low GI diet, crude fiber and dietary calcium intake increased, while the dietary GI reduced. Subjects in the lowest dietary glycemic index/glycemic load (GI/GL) quartile consumed more parboiled/basmati rice, pasta, milk/dairy products, fruits, and dough, which are foods from the low GI category. There was a significant reduction in the hemoglobin A1c level at week 12 for patients in the lowest GI/GL quartile (Δ = 20.7 ± 0.1%) compared with those in the highest GI/GL quartile (Δ = 20.1 ± 0.2%). Conclusions: These results demonstrate the ability of low GI dietary advice to improve the dietary quality of Asian patients with T2DM.

KW - Asian

KW - Carbohydrate exchanges

KW - Dietary quality

KW - Glycemic control

KW - Glycemic index

KW - Glycemic load

KW - Type 2 diabetes

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