Improvement of diabetic wound healing by topical application of Vicenin-2 hydrocolloid film on Sprague Dawley rats 11 Medical and Health Sciences 1103 Clinical Sciences

Woan Sean Tan, Palanisamy Arulselvan, Shiow Fern Ng, Che Norma Mat Taib, Murni Nazira Sarian, Sharida Fakurazi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Impaired wound healing is a debilitating complication of diabetes that leads to significant morbidity, particularly foot ulcers. The risk of developing diabetic foot ulcers for diabetic patients is 15% over their lifetime and approximately 85% of limb amputations is caused by non-healing ulcers. Unhealed, gangrenous wounds destroy the structural integrity of the skin, which acts as a protective barrier that prevents the invasion of external noxious agents into the body. Vicenin-2 (VCN-2) has been reported to contain prospective anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties that enhance cell proliferation and migration. Sodium Alginate (SA) is a natural polysaccharide that possesses gel forming properties and has biodegradable and biocompatible characteristics. Therefore, the objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of SA wound dressings containing VCN-2 on diabetic wounds. Methods: Wounds were inflicted in type-1 diabetic-streptozotocin (STZ) induced male Sprague Dawley rats. Subsequently, relevant groups were topically treated with the indicated concentrations (12.5, 25 and 50 μM) of VCN-2 hydrocolloid film over the study duration (14 days). The control group was treated with vehicle dressing (blank or allantoin). Wounded tissues and blood serum were collected on 0, 7 and 14 days prior to sacrifice. Appropriate wound assessments such as histological tests, nitric oxide assays, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and immunoblotting assays were conducted to confirm wound healing efficacy in the in vivo model. One-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was used for statistical analysis. Results: Results showed that hydrocolloid film was recapitulated with VCN-2 enhanced diabetic wound healing in a dose-dependent manner. VCN-2 reduced pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α), mediators (iNOS and COX-2), and nitric oxide (NO) via the NF-κB pathway. Data suggests that the VCN-2 film facilitated healing in hyperglycemic conditions by releasing growth factors such as (VEGF and TGF-β) to enhance cell proliferation, migration, and wound contraction via the VEGF and TGF-β mechanism pathways. Conclusions: This study's findings suggest that VCN-2 may possess wound healing potential since topical treatment with VCN-2 hydrocolloid films effectively enhanced wound healing in hyperglycemic conditions.

Original languageEnglish
Article number20
JournalBMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Jan 2019

Fingerprint

Colloids
Wound Healing
Sprague Dawley Rats
Health
Wounds and Injuries
Bandages
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
Cell Movement
Nitric Oxide
Cell Proliferation
Allantoin
Foot Ulcer
Diabetic Foot
apigenin-6,8-di-C-glycopyranoside
Diabetes Complications
Streptozocin
Interleukin-1
Amputation
Immunoblotting
Oxidants

Keywords

  • Diabetic wound
  • Hydrocolloid film
  • Sodium alginate
  • Vicenin-2

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Complementary and alternative medicine

Cite this

Improvement of diabetic wound healing by topical application of Vicenin-2 hydrocolloid film on Sprague Dawley rats 11 Medical and Health Sciences 1103 Clinical Sciences. / Tan, Woan Sean; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Ng, Shiow Fern; Mat Taib, Che Norma; Sarian, Murni Nazira; Fakurazi, Sharida.

In: BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Vol. 19, No. 1, 20, 17.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Tan, Woan Sean

AU - Arulselvan, Palanisamy

AU - Ng, Shiow Fern

AU - Mat Taib, Che Norma

AU - Sarian, Murni Nazira

AU - Fakurazi, Sharida

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N2 - Background: Impaired wound healing is a debilitating complication of diabetes that leads to significant morbidity, particularly foot ulcers. The risk of developing diabetic foot ulcers for diabetic patients is 15% over their lifetime and approximately 85% of limb amputations is caused by non-healing ulcers. Unhealed, gangrenous wounds destroy the structural integrity of the skin, which acts as a protective barrier that prevents the invasion of external noxious agents into the body. Vicenin-2 (VCN-2) has been reported to contain prospective anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties that enhance cell proliferation and migration. Sodium Alginate (SA) is a natural polysaccharide that possesses gel forming properties and has biodegradable and biocompatible characteristics. Therefore, the objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of SA wound dressings containing VCN-2 on diabetic wounds. Methods: Wounds were inflicted in type-1 diabetic-streptozotocin (STZ) induced male Sprague Dawley rats. Subsequently, relevant groups were topically treated with the indicated concentrations (12.5, 25 and 50 μM) of VCN-2 hydrocolloid film over the study duration (14 days). The control group was treated with vehicle dressing (blank or allantoin). Wounded tissues and blood serum were collected on 0, 7 and 14 days prior to sacrifice. Appropriate wound assessments such as histological tests, nitric oxide assays, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and immunoblotting assays were conducted to confirm wound healing efficacy in the in vivo model. One-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was used for statistical analysis. Results: Results showed that hydrocolloid film was recapitulated with VCN-2 enhanced diabetic wound healing in a dose-dependent manner. VCN-2 reduced pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α), mediators (iNOS and COX-2), and nitric oxide (NO) via the NF-κB pathway. Data suggests that the VCN-2 film facilitated healing in hyperglycemic conditions by releasing growth factors such as (VEGF and TGF-β) to enhance cell proliferation, migration, and wound contraction via the VEGF and TGF-β mechanism pathways. Conclusions: This study's findings suggest that VCN-2 may possess wound healing potential since topical treatment with VCN-2 hydrocolloid films effectively enhanced wound healing in hyperglycemic conditions.

AB - Background: Impaired wound healing is a debilitating complication of diabetes that leads to significant morbidity, particularly foot ulcers. The risk of developing diabetic foot ulcers for diabetic patients is 15% over their lifetime and approximately 85% of limb amputations is caused by non-healing ulcers. Unhealed, gangrenous wounds destroy the structural integrity of the skin, which acts as a protective barrier that prevents the invasion of external noxious agents into the body. Vicenin-2 (VCN-2) has been reported to contain prospective anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties that enhance cell proliferation and migration. Sodium Alginate (SA) is a natural polysaccharide that possesses gel forming properties and has biodegradable and biocompatible characteristics. Therefore, the objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of SA wound dressings containing VCN-2 on diabetic wounds. Methods: Wounds were inflicted in type-1 diabetic-streptozotocin (STZ) induced male Sprague Dawley rats. Subsequently, relevant groups were topically treated with the indicated concentrations (12.5, 25 and 50 μM) of VCN-2 hydrocolloid film over the study duration (14 days). The control group was treated with vehicle dressing (blank or allantoin). Wounded tissues and blood serum were collected on 0, 7 and 14 days prior to sacrifice. Appropriate wound assessments such as histological tests, nitric oxide assays, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and immunoblotting assays were conducted to confirm wound healing efficacy in the in vivo model. One-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was used for statistical analysis. Results: Results showed that hydrocolloid film was recapitulated with VCN-2 enhanced diabetic wound healing in a dose-dependent manner. VCN-2 reduced pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α), mediators (iNOS and COX-2), and nitric oxide (NO) via the NF-κB pathway. Data suggests that the VCN-2 film facilitated healing in hyperglycemic conditions by releasing growth factors such as (VEGF and TGF-β) to enhance cell proliferation, migration, and wound contraction via the VEGF and TGF-β mechanism pathways. Conclusions: This study's findings suggest that VCN-2 may possess wound healing potential since topical treatment with VCN-2 hydrocolloid films effectively enhanced wound healing in hyperglycemic conditions.

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