Implementation of problem-based learning in child and adolescent psychiatry: Shared experiences of a special-interest study group

Norbert Skokauskas, Anthony P S Guerrero, Mark D. Hanson, Xavier Coll, Moli Paul, Peter Szatmari, Susan M K Tan, Cathy K. Bell, Jeffrey Hunt

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    7 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background/Objective: Problem-based learning (PBL) represents a major development and change in educational practice that continues to have a large impact across subjects and disciplines worldwide. It would seem that child and adolescent psychiatry, because of its inherently integrative, bio-psycho-social nature and emphasis on teamwork and collaboration, would be a specialty learned optimally through PBL. Thus, there was a need to establish an international group where experiences in implementing PBL in child and adolescent psychiatry could be shared. This article reports on the first meeting and plans of the Problem-Based Learning in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (CAP) Special Interest Study Group (SISG), held at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Methods: Through international collaboration and information- sharing, the SISG aims to promote knowledge among Child and Adolescent Psychiatrists on PBL, to explore evaluation methods of PBL in CAP, and to discuss development of PBLbased curricula. Results: Problem-based learning (PBL) represents a major change in education that has had a large impact across disciplines worldwide. Conclusion: The core steps in PBL are the following: presentation of the initial problem; discussion of the problem, and development of learning objectives; independent learning focused on the objectives; and discussion, exploration of new ideas, and discovery of solutions in the reconvened group. Different from the traditional teacher's role, the PBL tutor is an active facilitator who guides learners to identify issues and ways to learn, rather than a "content expert" who provides facts.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)249-251
    Number of pages3
    JournalAcademic Psychiatry
    Volume35
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jul 2011

    Fingerprint

    Adolescent Psychiatry
    Child Psychiatry
    Public Opinion
    Problem-Based Learning
    study group
    psychiatry
    adolescent
    learning
    experience
    Learning
    Information Dissemination
    teacher's role
    Curriculum
    learning objective
    Psychiatry
    psychiatrist
    teamwork
    educational practice
    tutor
    academy

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Psychiatry and Mental health
    • Education
    • Medicine(all)

    Cite this

    Skokauskas, N., Guerrero, A. P. S., Hanson, M. D., Coll, X., Paul, M., Szatmari, P., ... Hunt, J. (2011). Implementation of problem-based learning in child and adolescent psychiatry: Shared experiences of a special-interest study group. Academic Psychiatry, 35(4), 249-251. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ap.35.4.249

    Implementation of problem-based learning in child and adolescent psychiatry : Shared experiences of a special-interest study group. / Skokauskas, Norbert; Guerrero, Anthony P S; Hanson, Mark D.; Coll, Xavier; Paul, Moli; Szatmari, Peter; Tan, Susan M K; Bell, Cathy K.; Hunt, Jeffrey.

    In: Academic Psychiatry, Vol. 35, No. 4, 07.2011, p. 249-251.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Skokauskas, N, Guerrero, APS, Hanson, MD, Coll, X, Paul, M, Szatmari, P, Tan, SMK, Bell, CK & Hunt, J 2011, 'Implementation of problem-based learning in child and adolescent psychiatry: Shared experiences of a special-interest study group', Academic Psychiatry, vol. 35, no. 4, pp. 249-251. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ap.35.4.249
    Skokauskas, Norbert ; Guerrero, Anthony P S ; Hanson, Mark D. ; Coll, Xavier ; Paul, Moli ; Szatmari, Peter ; Tan, Susan M K ; Bell, Cathy K. ; Hunt, Jeffrey. / Implementation of problem-based learning in child and adolescent psychiatry : Shared experiences of a special-interest study group. In: Academic Psychiatry. 2011 ; Vol. 35, No. 4. pp. 249-251.
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