Impacts of and adaptations to sea level rise in Malaysia

Md Sujahangir Kabir Sarkar, Rawshan Ara Begum, Joy Jacqueline Pereira, Abdul Hamid Jaafar, M. Yusof Saari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sea level rise (SLR) due to global warming would severely affect the coastal areas of many countries of the world through inundation of coastal areas and islands, shoreline erosion, and destruction of important ecosystems such as wetlands and mangroves. A significant increase of sea level would hamper the economy, trade, tourism, biodiversity and livelihood. This article attempts to highlight a snapshot of physical, economic and social impacts of SLR and adaptation measures needed in Malaysia. In Malaysia, the total mangrove would be lost with 90 cm rise in the sea level and destruction of coastal bunds could inundate 1000 km2 agricultural lands. Malaysia would be needing 5750 million US$ PPP additional economic cost for SLR in 2030. In addition, Malaysia would lose 7000 km2 land area and more than 0.05 million population would be displaced by 1 m SLR in 2100 if no adaptation measures are taken. The country's total cost of SLR with and without adaptation would be 160.92 and 655.09 million US$/year respectively under A2 scenario. Thus, adaptation measures are necessary to reduce the possible impacts of SLR in coastal zones. Adaptation measures such as coastal defenses, beach nourishment, offshore barriers, flood gate, mangrove creation etc. should be taken to limit the negative impact of SLR in Malaysia. These adaptation measures and responses should be mainstreamed with local policy, planning and resilience-building strategies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)29-36
Number of pages8
JournalAsian Journal of Water, Environment and Pollution
Volume11
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Sea level
mangrove
sea level
beach nourishment
coastal protection
social impact
sea level rise
economic impact
cost
Economics
Biodiversity
coastal zone
global warming
shoreline
Global warming
Wetlands
Beaches
tourism
agricultural land
wetland

Keywords

  • adaptation measures
  • impacts
  • Malaysia
  • Sea level rise

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pollution
  • Water Science and Technology

Cite this

Impacts of and adaptations to sea level rise in Malaysia. / Sarkar, Md Sujahangir Kabir; Begum, Rawshan Ara; Pereira, Joy Jacqueline; Jaafar, Abdul Hamid; Saari, M. Yusof.

In: Asian Journal of Water, Environment and Pollution, Vol. 11, No. 2, 2014, p. 29-36.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sarkar, Md Sujahangir Kabir ; Begum, Rawshan Ara ; Pereira, Joy Jacqueline ; Jaafar, Abdul Hamid ; Saari, M. Yusof. / Impacts of and adaptations to sea level rise in Malaysia. In: Asian Journal of Water, Environment and Pollution. 2014 ; Vol. 11, No. 2. pp. 29-36.
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