Impact of disturbance on population and genetic structure of tropical forest trees

R Wickneswari V Ratnam, W. S. Ho, K. S. Lee, C. T. Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Effects of selective logging on the population and genetic structure of Shorea curtisii, Dryobalanops aromatica and Scaphium macropodum were examined via two approaches: (1) to investigate the immediate effects by studying a same population before and after logging and, (2) to determine the long term effects by comparing regenerated stands with an adjacent unlogged stand, assuming that they were genetically identical before logging. Reduction in basal area of trees from different size classes due to a single logging event ranged from -100 - 100% in S. curtisii, D. aromatica and S. macropodum with large trees >45 cm dbh generally being absent. Recruitment of seedlings and presence of saplings was generally high for the non-dipterocarp species, S. macropodum (100% increase) but low for the dipterocarp species, D. aromatica (45% decrease) and S. curtisii (53% decrease) in immediately logged-over forests. Damage to poles was high in S. curtisii (92% and 88% for basal area and tree density respectively), D. aromatica (33% and 57%) and S. macropodum (73% and 73%). These changes in population structure of some tree species can persist in regenerated forests even after 50 years of logging. No significant change in genetic diversity was observed for adults of S. macropodum and saplings of D. aromatica and S. curtisii immediately after logging. However, genetic diversity of seedlings and adults of S. curtisii was reduced by 34% and 85% respectively for hypothetical gametic diversity, Vgam and 30% and 85% respectively for latent genetic potential, LP immediately after logging. Substantial genetic erosion was also detected for adults of S. curtisii (71% reduction in V gam and 63% reduction in LP) and S. macropodum (31.5% reduction in Shannon diversity, H) in regenerated stands which were logged 50 years ago. Implications of these changes in population and genetic structure due to logging on sustainable management of genetic resources of tropical timber trees will be discussed in this paper.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)193-201
Number of pages9
JournalForest Genetics
Volume11
Issue number3-4
Publication statusPublished - 2004

Fingerprint

Genetic Structures
Population Genetics
Dryobalanops aromatica
forest trees
tropical forests
genetic structure
logging
tropical forest
population structure
disturbance
Dipterocarpaceae
sapling
Seedlings
basal area
seedling
selective logging
saplings
genetic resource
Population
tropical wood

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science
  • Genetics
  • Forestry
  • Ecology
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Impact of disturbance on population and genetic structure of tropical forest trees. / V Ratnam, R Wickneswari; Ho, W. S.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, C. T.

In: Forest Genetics, Vol. 11, No. 3-4, 2004, p. 193-201.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

V Ratnam, R Wickneswari ; Ho, W. S. ; Lee, K. S. ; Lee, C. T. / Impact of disturbance on population and genetic structure of tropical forest trees. In: Forest Genetics. 2004 ; Vol. 11, No. 3-4. pp. 193-201.
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abstract = "Effects of selective logging on the population and genetic structure of Shorea curtisii, Dryobalanops aromatica and Scaphium macropodum were examined via two approaches: (1) to investigate the immediate effects by studying a same population before and after logging and, (2) to determine the long term effects by comparing regenerated stands with an adjacent unlogged stand, assuming that they were genetically identical before logging. Reduction in basal area of trees from different size classes due to a single logging event ranged from -100 - 100{\%} in S. curtisii, D. aromatica and S. macropodum with large trees >45 cm dbh generally being absent. Recruitment of seedlings and presence of saplings was generally high for the non-dipterocarp species, S. macropodum (100{\%} increase) but low for the dipterocarp species, D. aromatica (45{\%} decrease) and S. curtisii (53{\%} decrease) in immediately logged-over forests. Damage to poles was high in S. curtisii (92{\%} and 88{\%} for basal area and tree density respectively), D. aromatica (33{\%} and 57{\%}) and S. macropodum (73{\%} and 73{\%}). These changes in population structure of some tree species can persist in regenerated forests even after 50 years of logging. No significant change in genetic diversity was observed for adults of S. macropodum and saplings of D. aromatica and S. curtisii immediately after logging. However, genetic diversity of seedlings and adults of S. curtisii was reduced by 34{\%} and 85{\%} respectively for hypothetical gametic diversity, Vgam and 30{\%} and 85{\%} respectively for latent genetic potential, LP immediately after logging. Substantial genetic erosion was also detected for adults of S. curtisii (71{\%} reduction in V gam and 63{\%} reduction in LP) and S. macropodum (31.5{\%} reduction in Shannon diversity, H) in regenerated stands which were logged 50 years ago. Implications of these changes in population and genetic structure due to logging on sustainable management of genetic resources of tropical timber trees will be discussed in this paper.",
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