Impact of biological filtrations for organic micropollutants and polyfluoroalkyl substances removal from secondary effluent

Biplob Kumar Pramanik, Sagor Kumar Pramanik, Fatihah Suja`

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The impact of biological activated carbon (BAC), sand filtration (SF) and biological aerated filter (BAF) for removal of the selected organic micropollutants and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) from secondary effluent was studied. BAC led to greater removal of dissolved organic carbon (43%) than BAF (30%) which in turn was greater than SF (24%). All biological filtration systems could effectively remove most of the selected organic micropollutants, and there was a greater removal of these micropollutants by BAC (76–98%) than BAF (70–92%) or SF (68–90%). It was found that all treatment was effective for removal of the hydrophobic (log D > 3.2) and readily biodegradable organic micropollutants. The major mechanism for the removal of these molecules was biodegradation by the micro-organism and sorption by the biofilm. Compared to organic micropollutants removal, there was a lower removal of PFASs by all treatments, and BAF and SF had a considerably lower removal than BAC treatment. The better removal for all molecule types by BAC was due to additional adsorption capacity by the activated carbon. This study demonstrated that the BAC process was most effective in removing organic micropollutants present in the secondary effluent.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalEnvironmental Technology (United Kingdom)
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 19 Jan 2016

Fingerprint

Effluents
activated carbon
effluent
Activated carbon
Sand
filter
sand
Activated carbon treatment
micropollutant
removal
Molecules
Biofilms
Organic carbon
Biodegradation
dissolved organic carbon
biofilm
Sorption
biodegradation
sorption
adsorption

Keywords

  • biodegradation
  • Biofilter
  • micropollutants
  • organics
  • perfluorinated substances
  • secondary effluent

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Water Science and Technology

Cite this

Impact of biological filtrations for organic micropollutants and polyfluoroalkyl substances removal from secondary effluent. / Pramanik, Biplob Kumar; Pramanik, Sagor Kumar; Suja`, Fatihah.

In: Environmental Technology (United Kingdom), 19.01.2016, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{da77555a58b140609819ac0853877a44,
title = "Impact of biological filtrations for organic micropollutants and polyfluoroalkyl substances removal from secondary effluent",
abstract = "The impact of biological activated carbon (BAC), sand filtration (SF) and biological aerated filter (BAF) for removal of the selected organic micropollutants and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) from secondary effluent was studied. BAC led to greater removal of dissolved organic carbon (43{\%}) than BAF (30{\%}) which in turn was greater than SF (24{\%}). All biological filtration systems could effectively remove most of the selected organic micropollutants, and there was a greater removal of these micropollutants by BAC (76–98{\%}) than BAF (70–92{\%}) or SF (68–90{\%}). It was found that all treatment was effective for removal of the hydrophobic (log D > 3.2) and readily biodegradable organic micropollutants. The major mechanism for the removal of these molecules was biodegradation by the micro-organism and sorption by the biofilm. Compared to organic micropollutants removal, there was a lower removal of PFASs by all treatments, and BAF and SF had a considerably lower removal than BAC treatment. The better removal for all molecule types by BAC was due to additional adsorption capacity by the activated carbon. This study demonstrated that the BAC process was most effective in removing organic micropollutants present in the secondary effluent.",
keywords = "biodegradation, Biofilter, micropollutants, organics, perfluorinated substances, secondary effluent",
author = "Pramanik, {Biplob Kumar} and Pramanik, {Sagor Kumar} and Fatihah Suja`",
year = "2016",
month = "1",
day = "19",
doi = "10.1080/09593330.2015.1134677",
language = "English",
pages = "1--8",
journal = "Environmental Technology (United Kingdom)",
issn = "0959-3330",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Impact of biological filtrations for organic micropollutants and polyfluoroalkyl substances removal from secondary effluent

AU - Pramanik, Biplob Kumar

AU - Pramanik, Sagor Kumar

AU - Suja`, Fatihah

PY - 2016/1/19

Y1 - 2016/1/19

N2 - The impact of biological activated carbon (BAC), sand filtration (SF) and biological aerated filter (BAF) for removal of the selected organic micropollutants and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) from secondary effluent was studied. BAC led to greater removal of dissolved organic carbon (43%) than BAF (30%) which in turn was greater than SF (24%). All biological filtration systems could effectively remove most of the selected organic micropollutants, and there was a greater removal of these micropollutants by BAC (76–98%) than BAF (70–92%) or SF (68–90%). It was found that all treatment was effective for removal of the hydrophobic (log D > 3.2) and readily biodegradable organic micropollutants. The major mechanism for the removal of these molecules was biodegradation by the micro-organism and sorption by the biofilm. Compared to organic micropollutants removal, there was a lower removal of PFASs by all treatments, and BAF and SF had a considerably lower removal than BAC treatment. The better removal for all molecule types by BAC was due to additional adsorption capacity by the activated carbon. This study demonstrated that the BAC process was most effective in removing organic micropollutants present in the secondary effluent.

AB - The impact of biological activated carbon (BAC), sand filtration (SF) and biological aerated filter (BAF) for removal of the selected organic micropollutants and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) from secondary effluent was studied. BAC led to greater removal of dissolved organic carbon (43%) than BAF (30%) which in turn was greater than SF (24%). All biological filtration systems could effectively remove most of the selected organic micropollutants, and there was a greater removal of these micropollutants by BAC (76–98%) than BAF (70–92%) or SF (68–90%). It was found that all treatment was effective for removal of the hydrophobic (log D > 3.2) and readily biodegradable organic micropollutants. The major mechanism for the removal of these molecules was biodegradation by the micro-organism and sorption by the biofilm. Compared to organic micropollutants removal, there was a lower removal of PFASs by all treatments, and BAF and SF had a considerably lower removal than BAC treatment. The better removal for all molecule types by BAC was due to additional adsorption capacity by the activated carbon. This study demonstrated that the BAC process was most effective in removing organic micropollutants present in the secondary effluent.

KW - biodegradation

KW - Biofilter

KW - micropollutants

KW - organics

KW - perfluorinated substances

KW - secondary effluent

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84955120088&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84955120088&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/09593330.2015.1134677

DO - 10.1080/09593330.2015.1134677

M3 - Article

C2 - 26695189

AN - SCOPUS:84955120088

SP - 1

EP - 8

JO - Environmental Technology (United Kingdom)

JF - Environmental Technology (United Kingdom)

SN - 0959-3330

ER -