Images and issues of superpowers: An analysis of international news coverage by the government-owned news agency, Bernama in four national dailies in Malaysia

Faridah Ibrahim, Normah Mustaffa, Peng Kee Chang, Fauziah Ahmad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The importance of media as image carriers has been discussed widely as their role has become more pronounced amidst controversies during the incidents of war and armed conflict. The media have the potential to portray individuals, groups of individuals or nations in a negative or positive light, or in whatever manner they wish. As Walter Lippmann (1922) said, we cannot deny that our opinions are formed in part by gathering pieces of information that have been reported through the mass media and comparing them with the images of events or people, which already have been stored in our mind; hence, negative portrayals may conjure negative perceptions in our minds without actual knowledge of those we are being led to condemn. This paper argues that there is evidence that, in an increasingly global communication environment, Malaysian media, especially the mainstream media, are dependent on both local and international news agencies for news coverage especially on the Superpowers. To what extent do the images of superpowers portrayed by the government-owned National News Agency, Bernama and also international news agencies determine portrayals in mainstream newspapers, and in whose words are these images constructed? Using framing analysis based on a content analysis study of Bernama's and international news agencies' coverage, this paper also seeks to describe the dominant images and identify who subsidizes or monopolizes the portrayal of superpowers.

Original languageEnglish
Article number6
JournalInnovation Journal
Volume16
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Fingerprint

news agency
Malaysia
news
coverage
mass media
content analysis
incident
newspaper
event
communication
evidence
Group

Keywords

  • Conflict
  • Controversies
  • Image
  • International news
  • Mainstream newspapers
  • National news agencies
  • Superpowers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Administration

Cite this

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