Hyaluronic Acid-Based Biomaterials: A Versatile and Smart Approach to Tissue Regeneration and Treating Traumatic, Surgical, and Chronic Wounds

Zahid Hussain, Hnin Ei Thu, Haliza Katas, Bukhari Syed Nasir Abbas

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Wound healing is a multipart and dynamic process of replacing devitalized and damaged cellular structures and tissue layers. Numerous conventional wound dressings are employed for the management of wounds but there is a lack of absolute and versatile choice. An ideal wound healing modality should provide a moist environment, offer protection from secondary infections, eliminate wound exudate, and stimulate tissue regeneration. Hyaluronic acid (HA) has been known to promote angiogenesis, granulation tissue formation, remodeling of extracellular matrix (ECM), and wound healing. Accumulation and turnover of ECM is a hallmark of tissue injury, repair, and remodeling in wound healing. HA is a major component of ECM and plays an important role in regulating tissue injury, accelerating tissue repair, and controlling disease outcomes. A wide range of in vitro, in vivo, and clinical studies have demonstrated the wound healing efficacy of HA-based biomaterials not only in the treatment of wound in the tympanic membrane, skin, and articular cartilage but also in tracheal and corneal wound healing. Recent progress and improved therapeutic efficacy achieved through partial modification and formation of HA-based biomaterials, including HA-scaffolds, sponge-like hydrogels, anti-adhesive sheets, cultured dermal substitutes, thin membranes, and dermal matrix grafts have been discussed. The current review summarizes the evidence for the therapeutic effectiveness of HA-based biomaterials in the treatment of traumatic, surgical, and chronic wounds and tissue regeneration.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)594-630
Number of pages37
JournalPolymer Reviews
Volume57
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Oct 2017

Fingerprint

Hyaluronic acid
Tissue regeneration
Biocompatible Materials
Hyaluronic Acid
Biomaterials
Tissue
Repair
Artificial Skin
Membranes
Hydrogels
Granulation
Cartilage
Grafts
Scaffolds
Adhesives
Skin

Keywords

  • Biomaterials
  • chronic wounds
  • efficacy-upgradation
  • hyaluronic acid
  • tissue regeneration
  • traumatic and surgical wounds
  • wound healing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Polymers and Plastics
  • Materials Chemistry
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Hyaluronic Acid-Based Biomaterials : A Versatile and Smart Approach to Tissue Regeneration and Treating Traumatic, Surgical, and Chronic Wounds. / Hussain, Zahid; Thu, Hnin Ei; Katas, Haliza; Syed Nasir Abbas, Bukhari.

In: Polymer Reviews, Vol. 57, No. 4, 02.10.2017, p. 594-630.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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