Human melioidosis

an emerging medical problem

C. J. Smith, J. C. Allen, Mohammed Noor Embi, O. Othman, N. Razak, G. Ismail

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human melioidosis is endemic in South East Asia and tropical Australia. However, increasing numbers of case reports are coming from other parts of the world. Increasing world travel and the potential for person-to-person infection in non-endemic areas make the likelihood of physicians and medical microbiologists encountering the disease far greater than heretofore. Both the disease, melioidosis, and the causative organism, Pseudomonas pseudomallei, have unusual features which render them worthy of consideration. In this review, an overview is given of the microbiology of Pseudomonas pseudomallei. Original studies on the presence of fimbriae are presented and factors influencing pathogenicity of the organism discussed. Descriptions of the properties of the various 'exotoxins' are presented. Current veterinary and medical knowledge relating to the disease is outlined. Attention is drawn to those features-prolonged latency, multiplicity of presenting conditions and lack of a specific diagnostic characteristic-which make diagnosis difficult. Finally, details of an ELISA technique for the detection of Pseudomonas pseudomallei toxin are described. This may represent a method for rapid screening of patients allowing appropriate therapy to begin at the earliest moment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)343-366
Number of pages24
JournalMircen Journal of Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
Volume3
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1987

Fingerprint

Burkholderia pseudomallei
Melioidosis
Medical problems
exotoxins
Microbiology
Exotoxins
Far East
fimbriae
organisms
Virulence Factors
microbiology
physicians
South East Asia
rapid methods
travel
Screening
toxins
pathogenicity
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Biotechnology
  • Biochemistry
  • Plant Science
  • Food Science

Cite this

Human melioidosis : an emerging medical problem. / Smith, C. J.; Allen, J. C.; Embi, Mohammed Noor; Othman, O.; Razak, N.; Ismail, G.

In: Mircen Journal of Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, Vol. 3, No. 4, 12.1987, p. 343-366.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Smith, C. J. ; Allen, J. C. ; Embi, Mohammed Noor ; Othman, O. ; Razak, N. ; Ismail, G. / Human melioidosis : an emerging medical problem. In: Mircen Journal of Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology. 1987 ; Vol. 3, No. 4. pp. 343-366.
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