Home range size of sympatric squirrel species inhabiting a lowland dipterocarp forest in Malaysia

Saiful Arif Abdullah, A. H. Idris, Y. N. Rashid, N. Tamura, F. Hayashi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Home range sizes and spatial overlap of four sympatric squirrel species were investigated in a lowland dipterocarp forest in Malaysia using a radio-tracking method. The population density of Callosciurus caniceps was highest and C. notatus was next highest, while C. nigrovittatus and Lariscus insignis were scarce. C. caniceps was larger than C. nigrovittatus and C. notatus while L. insignis was extremely small. For females, home range size was smaller in L. insignis than Callosciurus spp., which may support the body weight hypothesis: larger species have larger home ranges. Among the three Callosciurus species, female C. caniceps had the smallest home range. These differences were accounted for by habitat characteristics rather than by density or body weight; C. caniceps was dominant in bushy areas and used crowded small trees while C. notatus and C. nigrovittatus used large trees in the forest. In this study, home range size did not change seasonally; this differs from studies in temperate regions, possibly because food availability is much less variable among seasons in tropical rain forest. Home range overlap among heterospecific individuals was common but different species seemed to partition space by using different vertical levels of the forest. Consequently, the home range size and spatial overlap of sympatric squirrel species may be affected by habitat diversity in tropical rain forest.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)346-351
Number of pages6
JournalBiotropica
Volume33
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2001

Fingerprint

Dipterocarpaceae
squirrels
home range
Malaysia
range size
lowlands
Callosciurus
tropical rain forests
body weight
habitat
habitats
forest trees
food availability
radio
population density

Keywords

  • Callosciurus
  • Diversity
  • Home range
  • Lariscus
  • Radio tracking
  • Squirrels
  • Tropical rain forest

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology

Cite this

Abdullah, S. A., Idris, A. H., Rashid, Y. N., Tamura, N., & Hayashi, F. (2001). Home range size of sympatric squirrel species inhabiting a lowland dipterocarp forest in Malaysia. Biotropica, 33(2), 346-351.

Home range size of sympatric squirrel species inhabiting a lowland dipterocarp forest in Malaysia. / Abdullah, Saiful Arif; Idris, A. H.; Rashid, Y. N.; Tamura, N.; Hayashi, F.

In: Biotropica, Vol. 33, No. 2, 2001, p. 346-351.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abdullah, SA, Idris, AH, Rashid, YN, Tamura, N & Hayashi, F 2001, 'Home range size of sympatric squirrel species inhabiting a lowland dipterocarp forest in Malaysia', Biotropica, vol. 33, no. 2, pp. 346-351.
Abdullah, Saiful Arif ; Idris, A. H. ; Rashid, Y. N. ; Tamura, N. ; Hayashi, F. / Home range size of sympatric squirrel species inhabiting a lowland dipterocarp forest in Malaysia. In: Biotropica. 2001 ; Vol. 33, No. 2. pp. 346-351.
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