Holistic ecological footprint for Malaysia

Rawshan Ara Begum, Joy Jacqueline Pereira

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This article briefly discusses the application of EF and the calculation of EF for Malaysia and its way forward. Calculation of the ecological footprint for Malaysia at the national level is limited and totally absent at the state and city levels. It is at these levels that they would serve a very useful purpose in guiding development planning. The fact thatthere is no commonly accepted method for footprint calculations poses a challenge. Another major challenge for the countryis limitation of data required to calculate the ecological footprint. However, the average Malaysian consumes 3.0 hectaresof land and sea to support people's demand on nature as same as to sustain their current life needs and wants. It takes 3.0 hectares of land and sea throughout the world to support each Malaysian. Ecological footprints range from as low as 0.07hectares/person for the built-up land to a high of 1.6 hectares/person for energy land. The largest contributor to the EF for each Malaysian is energy consumption (53% of total footprint). Thus, any effort to reduce energy consumption will serve to reduce the EF of the country. In this context, perhaps it is time to seriously review the issue of energy subsidies in Malaysia. This will also serve to improve the emission of carbon dioxide, as part of the country's efforts in climate change mitigation. It will also serve the country's aspiration for sustainability in development.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4783-4787
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Applied Sciences Research
Volume8
Issue number9
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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Keywords

  • Ecological footprint
  • Energy consumption
  • Malaysia
  • Sustainability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Holistic ecological footprint for Malaysia. / Begum, Rawshan Ara; Pereira, Joy Jacqueline.

In: Journal of Applied Sciences Research, Vol. 8, No. 9, 2012, p. 4783-4787.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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