High speed milling of Ti-6Al-4V using coated carbide tools

Nagi Elmagrabi, Che Hassan Che Haron, Jaharah A Ghani, F. M. Shuaeib

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The new challenge in machining is to use high cutting speed in order to increase the productivity. This is the main reason for rapid tool wear. For titanium and its alloy this problem is more severe due to its low thermal conductivity (about 6.6Wm_1K_1 for Ti-6Al-4V). This poor machinability has limited cutting speed to less than 60 m/min in industrial practice (Komanduri & Von-Turkovich 1981; Chandler 1989; Che Haron, et al. 2001). Furthermore, titanium alloys are generally difficult to machine at cutting speeds of over 30m/min with high-speed steel (HSS) tools, and over 60m/min with cemented tungsten carbide (WC) tools which result in very low productivity. In this work, dry slot milling tests were carried out on Titanium Alloys (Ti-6Al-4V) with uncoated and coated carbide cutting tools. The experimental tests were performed at various cutting speeds of 50, 80 and 105 m/min, with depth of cuts of 1, 1.5 and 2 mm and feed rates of 0.1, 0.15 and 2 mm/tooth respectively. Tool life and the quality of the surface finish were the factors that determine the performance of the cutting tool. Surface finish was studied based on the surface roughness and the microhardness underneath the machined surface. Microstructure of the sub-machined surface was observed in order to investigate the metallurgical alteration. It was found that the PVD coated carbide tool has a better tool life; with a maximum tool life of 11.5 minutes. Surface roughness is more sensitive to the feed rate and the depth of cut.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)153-162
Number of pages10
JournalEuropean Journal of Scientific Research
Volume22
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Fingerprint

carbides
Carbide tools
Titanium
High Speed
titanium
Titanium alloys
Thermal Conductivity
surface roughness
Steel
Titanium Alloy
Productivity
Surface roughness
Carbide cutting tools
Tooth
Surface Roughness
Quality of Life
dry milling
Machinability
industrial practice
Tungsten carbide

Keywords

  • Coated carbide
  • Dry machining
  • Machining
  • Titanium alloy
  • Tool life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

High speed milling of Ti-6Al-4V using coated carbide tools. / Elmagrabi, Nagi; Che Haron, Che Hassan; A Ghani, Jaharah; Shuaeib, F. M.

In: European Journal of Scientific Research, Vol. 22, No. 2, 2008, p. 153-162.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{357e7e914b1042d8b0797206939dc435,
title = "High speed milling of Ti-6Al-4V using coated carbide tools",
abstract = "The new challenge in machining is to use high cutting speed in order to increase the productivity. This is the main reason for rapid tool wear. For titanium and its alloy this problem is more severe due to its low thermal conductivity (about 6.6Wm_1K_1 for Ti-6Al-4V). This poor machinability has limited cutting speed to less than 60 m/min in industrial practice (Komanduri & Von-Turkovich 1981; Chandler 1989; Che Haron, et al. 2001). Furthermore, titanium alloys are generally difficult to machine at cutting speeds of over 30m/min with high-speed steel (HSS) tools, and over 60m/min with cemented tungsten carbide (WC) tools which result in very low productivity. In this work, dry slot milling tests were carried out on Titanium Alloys (Ti-6Al-4V) with uncoated and coated carbide cutting tools. The experimental tests were performed at various cutting speeds of 50, 80 and 105 m/min, with depth of cuts of 1, 1.5 and 2 mm and feed rates of 0.1, 0.15 and 2 mm/tooth respectively. Tool life and the quality of the surface finish were the factors that determine the performance of the cutting tool. Surface finish was studied based on the surface roughness and the microhardness underneath the machined surface. Microstructure of the sub-machined surface was observed in order to investigate the metallurgical alteration. It was found that the PVD coated carbide tool has a better tool life; with a maximum tool life of 11.5 minutes. Surface roughness is more sensitive to the feed rate and the depth of cut.",
keywords = "Coated carbide, Dry machining, Machining, Titanium alloy, Tool life",
author = "Nagi Elmagrabi and {Che Haron}, {Che Hassan} and {A Ghani}, Jaharah and Shuaeib, {F. M.}",
year = "2008",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
pages = "153--162",
journal = "European Journal of Scientific Research",
issn = "1450-202X",
publisher = "European Journals Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - High speed milling of Ti-6Al-4V using coated carbide tools

AU - Elmagrabi, Nagi

AU - Che Haron, Che Hassan

AU - A Ghani, Jaharah

AU - Shuaeib, F. M.

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - The new challenge in machining is to use high cutting speed in order to increase the productivity. This is the main reason for rapid tool wear. For titanium and its alloy this problem is more severe due to its low thermal conductivity (about 6.6Wm_1K_1 for Ti-6Al-4V). This poor machinability has limited cutting speed to less than 60 m/min in industrial practice (Komanduri & Von-Turkovich 1981; Chandler 1989; Che Haron, et al. 2001). Furthermore, titanium alloys are generally difficult to machine at cutting speeds of over 30m/min with high-speed steel (HSS) tools, and over 60m/min with cemented tungsten carbide (WC) tools which result in very low productivity. In this work, dry slot milling tests were carried out on Titanium Alloys (Ti-6Al-4V) with uncoated and coated carbide cutting tools. The experimental tests were performed at various cutting speeds of 50, 80 and 105 m/min, with depth of cuts of 1, 1.5 and 2 mm and feed rates of 0.1, 0.15 and 2 mm/tooth respectively. Tool life and the quality of the surface finish were the factors that determine the performance of the cutting tool. Surface finish was studied based on the surface roughness and the microhardness underneath the machined surface. Microstructure of the sub-machined surface was observed in order to investigate the metallurgical alteration. It was found that the PVD coated carbide tool has a better tool life; with a maximum tool life of 11.5 minutes. Surface roughness is more sensitive to the feed rate and the depth of cut.

AB - The new challenge in machining is to use high cutting speed in order to increase the productivity. This is the main reason for rapid tool wear. For titanium and its alloy this problem is more severe due to its low thermal conductivity (about 6.6Wm_1K_1 for Ti-6Al-4V). This poor machinability has limited cutting speed to less than 60 m/min in industrial practice (Komanduri & Von-Turkovich 1981; Chandler 1989; Che Haron, et al. 2001). Furthermore, titanium alloys are generally difficult to machine at cutting speeds of over 30m/min with high-speed steel (HSS) tools, and over 60m/min with cemented tungsten carbide (WC) tools which result in very low productivity. In this work, dry slot milling tests were carried out on Titanium Alloys (Ti-6Al-4V) with uncoated and coated carbide cutting tools. The experimental tests were performed at various cutting speeds of 50, 80 and 105 m/min, with depth of cuts of 1, 1.5 and 2 mm and feed rates of 0.1, 0.15 and 2 mm/tooth respectively. Tool life and the quality of the surface finish were the factors that determine the performance of the cutting tool. Surface finish was studied based on the surface roughness and the microhardness underneath the machined surface. Microstructure of the sub-machined surface was observed in order to investigate the metallurgical alteration. It was found that the PVD coated carbide tool has a better tool life; with a maximum tool life of 11.5 minutes. Surface roughness is more sensitive to the feed rate and the depth of cut.

KW - Coated carbide

KW - Dry machining

KW - Machining

KW - Titanium alloy

KW - Tool life

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=55249095821&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=55249095821&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 22

SP - 153

EP - 162

JO - European Journal of Scientific Research

JF - European Journal of Scientific Research

SN - 1450-202X

IS - 2

ER -