High resolution impedance manometry

A necessity or luxury in esophageal motility disorder?

Han Sin Boo, Ian Chik, Ngiu Chai Soon, Shyang Yee Lim, Razman Jarmin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Rare disease Background: The esophagus can be affected by a variety of disorders that may be primary or secondary to another pathologic process, but the resulting symptoms are usually not pathognomonic for a specific problem, making diagnosis and further management somewhat challenging. High resolution impedance manometry (HRiM) has established itself as a valuable tool in evaluating esophageal motility disorder. HRiM is superior in comparison with conventional water perfused manometric recordings in delineating and tracking the movement of functionally defined contractile elements of the esophagus and its sphincters, and in distinguishing the luminal pressurization of spastic esophageal contraction from a trapped bolus. Making these distinctions can help to identify achalasia, distal esophageal spasm, functional obstruction, and subtypes according to the latest Chicago Classification of Esophageal Motility Disorders version 3.0. Case Report: We report a case series of 4 patients that presented with dysphagia; and with the ancillary help of the HRiM, we are able to diagnose esophageal motility disorder and evaluate its pathogenetic mechanism. This approach aids in tailoring each management individually and avoiding disastrous mismanagement. Conclusions: From the series of case reports, we believe that HRiM has an important role to play in deciding appropriate management for patients presenting with esophageal motility disorders, and HRiM should be performed before deciding on management.

Original languageEnglish
Article number909717
Pages (from-to)998-1003
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Case Reports
Volume19
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23 Aug 2018

Fingerprint

Esophageal Motility Disorders
Manometry
Electric Impedance
Esophagus
Diffuse Esophageal Spasm
Esophageal Achalasia
Muscle Spasticity
Pathologic Processes
Deglutition Disorders
Rare Diseases
Water

Keywords

  • Diagnostic errors
  • Esophageal motility disorders
  • Manometry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

High resolution impedance manometry : A necessity or luxury in esophageal motility disorder? / Boo, Han Sin; Chik, Ian; Chai Soon, Ngiu; Lim, Shyang Yee; Jarmin, Razman.

In: American Journal of Case Reports, Vol. 19, 909717, 23.08.2018, p. 998-1003.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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