High prevalence of cryptosporidiosis amongst the Orang Asli (aborigine) children at Sungai Rual Post, Kelantan, Malaysia

Mohamed Kamel Abdul Ghani, Gopal Geishamini, Ahmad Zawawi Mariam, Yusof Hartini, Haron Norhisham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: Intestinal parasitic infections still continue to be the most common cause of chronic infections, in communities living in resource poor countries situated in the tropics and subtropics. This study was undertaken to investigate the prevalence of cryptosporidiosis amongst the Orang Asli (aborigine) children at Sg. Rual Post, Jeli, Kelantan. Materials and Methods: In this study, 111 Orang Asli primary school children aged 4-12 years were screened for the presence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in faecal samples using the Modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining technique. Results: Based on a single stool sample, 34.2% (38/111) of the overall population had cryptosporidiosis comprising of 35.8% (24/67) females and 31.8% (14/44) males. This indicates a high prevalence of this infection among the Orang Asli community of Post Sungai Rual. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of cryptosporidiosis between age and sex of the children who participated in this study. The high prevalence of cryptosporidiosis in this community may be attributed to their poor personal hygiene, socioeconomic status, living conditions, educational background and the lack of safe water supply. Conclusion: The high prevalence of cryptosporidiosis in this community warrants a spotlight on it as a public health problem. Public health personnel need to re-look at the current control measures and identify innovative and integrated ways in order to reduce cryptosporidiosis significantly and it is recommended that routine screening of stool samples for parasites should include the detection of Cryptosporidium.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)553-555
Number of pages3
JournalInternational Medical Journal
Volume23
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Fingerprint

Cryptosporidiosis
Malaysia
Cryptosporidium
Public Health
Parasitic Diseases
Oocysts
Water Supply
Social Conditions
Infection
Hygiene
Social Class
Health Personnel
Parasites
Staining and Labeling
Population

Keywords

  • Children
  • Cryptosporidium
  • Malaysia
  • Orang Asli (aborigine)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

High prevalence of cryptosporidiosis amongst the Orang Asli (aborigine) children at Sungai Rual Post, Kelantan, Malaysia. / Abdul Ghani, Mohamed Kamel; Geishamini, Gopal; Mariam, Ahmad Zawawi; Hartini, Yusof; Norhisham, Haron.

In: International Medical Journal, Vol. 23, No. 5, 2016, p. 553-555.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abdul Ghani, Mohamed Kamel ; Geishamini, Gopal ; Mariam, Ahmad Zawawi ; Hartini, Yusof ; Norhisham, Haron. / High prevalence of cryptosporidiosis amongst the Orang Asli (aborigine) children at Sungai Rual Post, Kelantan, Malaysia. In: International Medical Journal. 2016 ; Vol. 23, No. 5. pp. 553-555.
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