Heredity factor in myopia development among a sample in Klang valley, Malaysia

Sharanjeet-Kaur, Noor Islam Ramli, Sumithira Narayanasamy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Development of myopia among young children is often contributed to the refractive status of the parents. This study was conducted to determine whether myopia can be inherited across the generation among a sample in the Klang Valley. Three generations involved are: G1 (grandparents), G2 (parents) and G3 (children). Methods Sixty-two families were screened and forty families were selected to participate in this study. The inclusion criterion is having at least one myopic member in any of the three generations. Subjects (G2) were first asked to fill up a questionnaire form before their refractive status was determined by clinical examination that provided acuity of 6/6 or better. Refractive status of G1 was determined using information from the questionnaire while for G2 and G3 through clinical examination. Results Generally, the prevalence of myopia is seen to increase throughout the generations from G1 being the lowest (25.6%) to G3 being the highest (41.1%). Strong genetic influence can be found between G1 and G2 as majority of myopes in G2 is when both parents were myopic. However, although the prevalence of myopia increased from G2 to G3, there was no strong genetical influence. Majority of subjects in G3 were non-myopes when both their parents were myopic. Conclusion Parental history accounts for a limited proportion of variance in myopia development.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3522-3525
Number of pages4
JournalChinese Medical Journal
Volume125
Issue number19
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Oct 2012

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Heredity
Malaysia
Myopia
Grandparents

Keywords

  • Heredity
  • Myopia
  • Prevalence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Heredity factor in myopia development among a sample in Klang valley, Malaysia. / Sharanjeet-Kaur; Ramli, Noor Islam; Narayanasamy, Sumithira.

In: Chinese Medical Journal, Vol. 125, No. 19, 05.10.2012, p. 3522-3525.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sharanjeet-Kaur ; Ramli, Noor Islam ; Narayanasamy, Sumithira. / Heredity factor in myopia development among a sample in Klang valley, Malaysia. In: Chinese Medical Journal. 2012 ; Vol. 125, No. 19. pp. 3522-3525.
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