Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn caused by anti-D and anti-S alloantibodies: A case report

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Abstract

Introduction. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn is most commonly caused by anti-D alloantibody. It is usually seen in Rhesus D (RhD)-negative mothers that have been previously sensitized. We report here a case of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn in a newborn baby caused by anti-D and anti-S alloantibodies, born to a mother who was RhD negative, but with no previous serological evidence of RhD alloimmunization. Case presentation. A one-day-old Chinese baby boy was born to a mother who was group A RhD negative. The baby was jaundiced with hyperbilirubinemia, but with no evidence of infection. His blood group was group A RhD positive, his direct Coombs' test result was positive and red cell elution studies demonstrated the presence of anti-D and anti-S alloantibodies. Investigations performed on the maternal blood during the 22 weeks of gestation showed the presence of anti-S antibodies only. Repeat investigations performed post-natally showed the presence of similar antibodies as in the newborn and an anti-D titer of 1:32 (0.25 IU/mL), which was significant. A diagnosis of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn secondary to anti-D and anti-S was made. The baby was treated with phototherapy and close monitoring. He was discharged well after five days of phototherapy. Conclusions: This case illustrates the possibility of an anamnestic response of allo-anti-D from previous sensitization in a RhD-negative mother, or the development of anti-D in mid-trimester. Thus, it highlights the importance of thorough antenatal ABO, RhD blood grouping and antibody screening, and if necessary, antibody identification and regular monitoring of antibody screening and antibody levels for prevention or early detection of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn, especially in cases of mothers with clinically significant red cell alloantibody.

Original languageEnglish
Article number71
JournalJournal of Medical Case Reports
Volume6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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Fetal Erythroblastosis
Isoantibodies
Fetus
Mothers
Antibodies
Phototherapy
Newborn Infant
Blood Grouping and Crossmatching
Coombs Test
Hyperbilirubinemia
Blood Group Antigens
Jaundice
RHO(D) antibody
Early Diagnosis
Anti-Idiotypic Antibodies
Pregnancy
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

@article{973e978f898348949712b50e34b1ce09,
title = "Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn caused by anti-D and anti-S alloantibodies: A case report",
abstract = "Introduction. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn is most commonly caused by anti-D alloantibody. It is usually seen in Rhesus D (RhD)-negative mothers that have been previously sensitized. We report here a case of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn in a newborn baby caused by anti-D and anti-S alloantibodies, born to a mother who was RhD negative, but with no previous serological evidence of RhD alloimmunization. Case presentation. A one-day-old Chinese baby boy was born to a mother who was group A RhD negative. The baby was jaundiced with hyperbilirubinemia, but with no evidence of infection. His blood group was group A RhD positive, his direct Coombs' test result was positive and red cell elution studies demonstrated the presence of anti-D and anti-S alloantibodies. Investigations performed on the maternal blood during the 22 weeks of gestation showed the presence of anti-S antibodies only. Repeat investigations performed post-natally showed the presence of similar antibodies as in the newborn and an anti-D titer of 1:32 (0.25 IU/mL), which was significant. A diagnosis of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn secondary to anti-D and anti-S was made. The baby was treated with phototherapy and close monitoring. He was discharged well after five days of phototherapy. Conclusions: This case illustrates the possibility of an anamnestic response of allo-anti-D from previous sensitization in a RhD-negative mother, or the development of anti-D in mid-trimester. Thus, it highlights the importance of thorough antenatal ABO, RhD blood grouping and antibody screening, and if necessary, antibody identification and regular monitoring of antibody screening and antibody levels for prevention or early detection of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn, especially in cases of mothers with clinically significant red cell alloantibody.",
author = "Rabeya Yousuf and {Abdul Aziz}, Suria and Nurasyikin Yusof and {Chooi Fun}, Leong",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1186/1752-1947-6-71",
language = "English",
volume = "6",
journal = "Journal of Medical Case Reports",
issn = "1752-1947",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn caused by anti-D and anti-S alloantibodies

T2 - A case report

AU - Yousuf, Rabeya

AU - Abdul Aziz, Suria

AU - Yusof, Nurasyikin

AU - Chooi Fun, Leong

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Introduction. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn is most commonly caused by anti-D alloantibody. It is usually seen in Rhesus D (RhD)-negative mothers that have been previously sensitized. We report here a case of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn in a newborn baby caused by anti-D and anti-S alloantibodies, born to a mother who was RhD negative, but with no previous serological evidence of RhD alloimmunization. Case presentation. A one-day-old Chinese baby boy was born to a mother who was group A RhD negative. The baby was jaundiced with hyperbilirubinemia, but with no evidence of infection. His blood group was group A RhD positive, his direct Coombs' test result was positive and red cell elution studies demonstrated the presence of anti-D and anti-S alloantibodies. Investigations performed on the maternal blood during the 22 weeks of gestation showed the presence of anti-S antibodies only. Repeat investigations performed post-natally showed the presence of similar antibodies as in the newborn and an anti-D titer of 1:32 (0.25 IU/mL), which was significant. A diagnosis of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn secondary to anti-D and anti-S was made. The baby was treated with phototherapy and close monitoring. He was discharged well after five days of phototherapy. Conclusions: This case illustrates the possibility of an anamnestic response of allo-anti-D from previous sensitization in a RhD-negative mother, or the development of anti-D in mid-trimester. Thus, it highlights the importance of thorough antenatal ABO, RhD blood grouping and antibody screening, and if necessary, antibody identification and regular monitoring of antibody screening and antibody levels for prevention or early detection of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn, especially in cases of mothers with clinically significant red cell alloantibody.

AB - Introduction. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn is most commonly caused by anti-D alloantibody. It is usually seen in Rhesus D (RhD)-negative mothers that have been previously sensitized. We report here a case of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn in a newborn baby caused by anti-D and anti-S alloantibodies, born to a mother who was RhD negative, but with no previous serological evidence of RhD alloimmunization. Case presentation. A one-day-old Chinese baby boy was born to a mother who was group A RhD negative. The baby was jaundiced with hyperbilirubinemia, but with no evidence of infection. His blood group was group A RhD positive, his direct Coombs' test result was positive and red cell elution studies demonstrated the presence of anti-D and anti-S alloantibodies. Investigations performed on the maternal blood during the 22 weeks of gestation showed the presence of anti-S antibodies only. Repeat investigations performed post-natally showed the presence of similar antibodies as in the newborn and an anti-D titer of 1:32 (0.25 IU/mL), which was significant. A diagnosis of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn secondary to anti-D and anti-S was made. The baby was treated with phototherapy and close monitoring. He was discharged well after five days of phototherapy. Conclusions: This case illustrates the possibility of an anamnestic response of allo-anti-D from previous sensitization in a RhD-negative mother, or the development of anti-D in mid-trimester. Thus, it highlights the importance of thorough antenatal ABO, RhD blood grouping and antibody screening, and if necessary, antibody identification and regular monitoring of antibody screening and antibody levels for prevention or early detection of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn, especially in cases of mothers with clinically significant red cell alloantibody.

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