Health issue commodity promotion. Impacts on US edible vegetable oil demand

Jamal Othman, Jack E. Houston, Christopher S. Mclntosh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Analysis of monthly data for January 1980 through December 1990 provides evidence that an American Soybean Association (ASA) promotional campaign focusing negative attention on the health issue of tropical oils induced structural change in US domestic consumption of edible palm and coconut oils. Evidence strongly suggests that the decline in tropical oil imports and consumption can be attributed to processor changes in inputs resulting from perceived consumer responses to the ASA health issues campaign. The study found prices of tropical oils to be insignificant in determining short-run soybean and cottonseed oil demand. Conversely, such domestic commodity promotion campaigns may have devastating s hort-term impacts on imports, which in turn are significant to the exports of a small number of producing countries. If the perceived negative attributes are less serious than implied, counter-promotion may diminish consumers' concerns over time or create new product markets, and declining tropical oil imports might be only temporarily affected.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)214-223
Number of pages10
JournalFood Policy
Volume18
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Plant Oils
vegetable oil
vegetables
products and commodities
commodity
import
Oils
promotion
campaign
imports
oils
oil
demand
Health
health
Soybeans
soybean
soybeans
Cottonseed Oil
structural change

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Development
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Health issue commodity promotion. Impacts on US edible vegetable oil demand. / Othman, Jamal; Houston, Jack E.; Mclntosh, Christopher S.

In: Food Policy, Vol. 18, No. 3, 1993, p. 214-223.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Othman, Jamal ; Houston, Jack E. ; Mclntosh, Christopher S. / Health issue commodity promotion. Impacts on US edible vegetable oil demand. In: Food Policy. 1993 ; Vol. 18, No. 3. pp. 214-223.
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