Health information systems adoption: findings from a systematic review.

Maryati Mohd. Yusof, Lampros Stergioulas, Jasmina Zugic

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Earlier evaluation studies on Health Information Systems (HIS) adoption have highlighted a large number of adoption problems that were attributed to the lack of fit between technology, human and organisation factors. Lessons can be learned from these evaluation studies by identifying the most important factors of HIS adoption. In order to study the adoption issue, a qualitative systematic review has been performed using a recently introduced framework, known as HOT-fit (Human, Organisation and Technology fit). The paper identifies and highlights the following critical adoption factors: technology (ease of use, system usefulness, system flexibility, time efficiency, information accessibility and relevancy); human (user training, user perception, user roles, user skills, clarity of system purpose, user involvement); organisation (leadership and support, clinical process, user involvement, internal communication, inter organisational system, as well as the fit between them. The findings can be used to guide future system development and inform relevant decision making.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)262-266
Number of pages5
JournalMedinfo. MEDINFO
Volume12
Issue numberPt 1
Publication statusPublished - 2007

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Health Information Systems
Technology
Decision Making
Communication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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Health information systems adoption : findings from a systematic review. / Mohd. Yusof, Maryati; Stergioulas, Lampros; Zugic, Jasmina.

In: Medinfo. MEDINFO, Vol. 12, No. Pt 1, 2007, p. 262-266.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mohd. Yusof, M, Stergioulas, L & Zugic, J 2007, 'Health information systems adoption: findings from a systematic review.', Medinfo. MEDINFO, vol. 12, no. Pt 1, pp. 262-266.
Mohd. Yusof, Maryati ; Stergioulas, Lampros ; Zugic, Jasmina. / Health information systems adoption : findings from a systematic review. In: Medinfo. MEDINFO. 2007 ; Vol. 12, No. Pt 1. pp. 262-266.
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